Tag Archives: Content Syndication

A Shortlist of Google’s Top Ranking Factors … an Excerpt from Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Enjoy this excerpt from the upcoming sixth installment of the T-Shaped Marketing for Authors mini ebook series. Coming soon to an e-reader near you…

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Throughout this T-shaped marketing ebook series, in several of my past blog posts, and in many of my other books, I’ve referenced the following six ranking factors that will help you to improve your website’s SEO. Improving your SEO is crucial to your success as an author because it will help you to attract more readers and sell more books. How do I know these things work when applied with a consistent focus? Because I’ve watched the PPG Publisher’s Blog increase from a mere 1,000 registered users in early 2017 to over 5,000 a short year later (and still growing) by doing all the things I recommend to you. I’ve also seen downloads of my backlist books on ecommerce sites such as Amazon, Kobo, and E-Sentral collectively increase from under 5 books per month to over 300 per month on average (and still growing) within the same time period. That’s my firsthand experience with this to date. I also regularly read the research published by SEO industry leaders, such as Moz, which has guided me in building my book business so I can guide authors like you in doing the same. In short, this stuff works!

  1. Publish relevant content on a consistent basis:
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    Blogging is one of the best ways for you to stay engaged with your current and prospective readership; and, the more often you post something new online, the more points Google will award to your blog site thus improving its SEO. But you should know that Google is far from being the only search engine that rewards new content. Amazon and Kobo do, too, as mentioned in this book. Want to dramatically increase your SEO over the next year? Start posting relevant content on a consistent basis that pleases all these search engines.
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  2. Build a high number of relevant backlinks to your website:
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    In addition to blogging, I’ve also mentioned how legitimate book reviews, guest blogging, and content syndication can be used to increase the number of relevant backlinks to your website. This, too, is worthy of a higher ranking in Google’s eyes thus improving your SEO.
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  3. Protect and improve your SEO with proper HTML coding (REL=CANONICAL and META NOINDEX tags):
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    While guest blogging and content syndication are both fantastic ways to improve your own website’s SEO, they can also cause duplicate content issues if too much of the same copy is being reused on different sites without due care. This is where implementing REL=CANONICAL and META NOINDEX tags can come in really handy as discussed in the HTML Coding for Beginners T-shaped ebook.
  4. Attract regular click-through traffic to your website:
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    It stands to reason that the more content you post, the more backlinks that redirect to your site, and the higher your SEO ranking grows, the more traffic will find its way to your website and click on it. You want these people to stay there as long as possible. If they only click once and then leave, that’s called a bounce; but, if they click on a few different pages and stay there for a while to read things over, that’s called a click-through. A high bounce rate may affect your SEO negatively while you’ll garner more SEO points via an increased click-through rate—all the more reason to ensure your website contains relative and enticing content people will want to stay there and view.
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  5. Encourage more social media activity and shares (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube):
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    I dedicated an entire book, titled Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors, to teaching authors how to utilize social media marketing as part of your online sales strategy. Did you know social media activity is one of the things Google rewards that can help to improve your SEO? Well, it is. And certain social media sites will earn you more points than others, so I’ve learned. For example, did you know YouTube is owned by Google? Now that you know, you may be more inclined to start posting more video content on a regular basis.
     
  6. Make sure your website is mobile-friendly:
     
    On March 26, 2018, Google went live with its new Mobile-First Index. According to Google, “Mobile-first indexing means Google will predominantly use the mobile version of the content for indexing and ranking. Historically, the index primarily used the desktop version of a page’s content when evaluating the relevance of a page to a user’s query. Since the majority of users now access Google via a mobile device, the index will primarily use the mobile version of a page’s content going forward. We aren’t creating a separate mobile-first index. We continue to use only one index.” If you want to know how to ensure your own website is mobile-friendly, be sure to pick up a copy of the Mobile Marketing T-shaped marketing ebook for some great tips.

Although I’ve written and spoken about the above six SEO ranking factors before, I’ve never discussed the below six. We’re going to review them in this book because, according to Searchmetrics Ranking Factors, they are some of the strongest factors that were found in all the sites surveyed that ranked in the top 10 Google search results:

  1. Protect your website’s security with HTTPS (SSL security certificates).
  2. Include attractive images and easy-to-read fonts in your website’s main content area to encourage more time on the site.
  3. Increase Pinterest activity.
  4. Increase Google+1 activity.
  5. Ensure you have a strong local SEO (e.g., free listings in business directories such as Google My Business, White Page, Yellow Pages, Yelp).
  6. Answer industry-related questions on your blog to encourage featured snippets inclusion (as briefly mentioned in the Pay-per-click (PPC) Advertising T-Shaped ebook).

As you can see, there are even more things you can do to improve your SEO that will be covered in this latest T-Shaped Marketing for Authors mini ebook. Do all these things, and the end result will surely be an increased readership and more book sales for you. Now, let’s dive in a little deeper to learn more….

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I hope you enjoyed that little excerpt. Watch for the book this coming month on Amazon, and a couple of months later on both Kobo and E-Sentral.



How Content Syndication Can Help Authors Sell More Books (An Excerpt)

Enjoy this excerpt from Guest Blogging and Content Syndication (T-Shaped Marketing for Authors Book 2)

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An SEO Analogy: Retail Merchandising

When you think about it, SEO is a lot like effective merchandising in a “bricks and mortar” bookstore. It’s all about positioning. The books that are strategically placed at eye level in the front aisles, or on shelving units and tables in the high-traffic areas of a store, are going to sell more than the books that are tucked away on low shelves where most people don’t bother to look.

It works much the same way online. The whole point of improving the SEO of any webpage is to ensure it appears as close to the top of an online search as possible so that more people can easily see it. The higher its visibility, the better your chance of it being clicked on which translates into the better chance of a sale down the road. And that’s what we’re all after here, isn’t it? At the end of the day, authors are blogging to promote their books with the intent of selling more copies and improving their readerships.

Here’s the good news: it’s somewhat easier—and much more cost effective—to improve your positioning online than it is within a traditional bookstore, particularly the major chain stores. If you want prime real estate in a major chain, allowing you to be seen by hundreds or even thousands of impulse buyers on any given day, you’re going to have to pay upfront for the privilege. How much will it cost you? John B. Thompson provides details about this in his 2012 Kindle ebook titled Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century:

The front-of-store area that is in your field of vision is a thoroughly commodified space: most of the books you see will be there by virtue of the fact that the publisher has paid for placement, either directly by means of a placement fee (that is, co-op advertising) or indirectly by means of extra discount. Roughly speaking, it costs around a dollar a book to put a new hardback on the front-of-store table in a major chain, and around $10,000 to put a new title on front-of-store tables in all the chain’s stores for two weeks (typically the minimum period). … Visibility does not come cheap. (Thompson, 2012)

While you can choose to pay for increased exposure online by running pay-per-click advertising campaigns or buying banner ads on high-traffic websites, the difference here is that you don’t have to. Blogging is an organic—not to mention free—way of improving your online ranking. Your only cost is your time.

Don’t Get Dinged by the SEO Gods!

Now, here’s the kicker: all of your online articles and blog posts have to be original content. Why? Because also built into these search engine algorithms is the ability to detect copied/reused content—and copied/reused content is a no-no in the online world. It is treated like a form of plagiarism and penalized by search engines in the sense that it won’t be indexed by them at all; rather, it will be ignored altogether. The search engines will compare two webpages that contain the same content and choose only one—most likely the original, higher ranking page—to include in search results. The copycat webpage will fall into online oblivion, never to be seen or heard from on the search engines again.

Content Syndication to the Rescue

The obvious issue here is time. Where is the time to write all your books, and write original articles for other online publications, and post unique content to your own blog on a regular basis so you can organically grow (and maintain) a strong online presence? Even the simple idea of it is daunting enough itself, never mind actually doing it day in and day out. We all have busy lives, after all.

This is where content syndication comes into play as explained by Christopher Ratcliff in his article titled “What is content syndication and how do I get started?” on the Search Engine Watch website. According to Ratcliff, content syndication is great for new authors and publishers who want to expose their books and blogs to a much larger audience, but who just don’t have the time or manpower to write copious amounts of new content on a daily basis.

Content syndication is the process of pushing your blogpost, article, video or any piece of web-based content out to other third-parties who will then republish it on their own sites….

Content syndication is particularly useful if you’re a smaller publisher or an up-and-coming writer who wants a larger audience from a more authoritative site.

By having your blog content published on The Guardian (for instance) you will be exposed to a much wider audience that isn’t your own, who may then visit you on your own blog.

The other major reason for doing this is SEO. Some of that bigger site’s authority should be passed down to you. (Ratcliff, 2016)

“Okay. Great,” you’re thinking. “So, I won’t have to write as much unique content on a regular basis. But how does this resolve the issue of copied/reused content?” That’s a great question, and here are three simple solutions to that problem.

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Hope you enjoyed that short excerpt. You can learn the three simple solutions here: Guest Blogging and Content Syndication (T-Shaped Marketing for Authors Book 2).



[COMING SOON!] Seven New Ebooks in the T-Shaped Marketing for Authors Series

Guest Blogging and Content Syndication

HTML Coding for Beginners

Mobile Marketing

Pay-per-click (PPC) Advertising

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Social Marketing

Video Marketing

T-Shaped Marketing for Authors. The New Way to Sell Books.

Online marketing provides today’s authors with a vehicle to reach a worldwide audience where, in the past, they were pretty much limited to their own backyards. But to make any kind of real headway in this crowded space full of millions of people doing the same thing as you’re doing online, you’ve got to be Internet savvy to a degree. You’ve got to figure out a way to stand out among the rest by combining analytical and creative skills together. I’m talking about T-shaped marketing.

Co-founder of Moz, Rand Fishkin (2013), provides this succinct description of T-shaped marketing on his company’s blog:

“T-Shaped basically refers to having a light level of knowledge in a broad
array of skills, and deep knowledge/ability in a single one (or a few).”

In other words, your deep knowledge/ability—the stem of the T—is the content you’ve written about in your book(s). The flat, horizontal part at the top represents the various creative and analytical skills you can learn to best utilize the Internet in selling your book(s).

Some of today’s most recognized companies used their own unique T-shaped marketing strategies (also referred to as “growth hacking”) to build their businesses quickly when little or no venture capital was available to them: Airbnb used some shrewd background coding to hack the Craigslist platform to boost its own site’s user experience; PayPal grew quickly by paying early users for referrals; and Dropbox used a strategy similar to PayPal’s by giving early users extra storage for referrals. These tactics piggybacked their other online efforts (e.g., SEO, PPC) to supercharge each company’s scalability, hence the term “growth hacking.”

Authors can do the same. They can use T-shaped marketing to their advantage, and many of today’s most successful online authors already do. Each ebook in this series will focus on one particular T-shaped marketing avenue so authors can learn to utilize several customized strategies:

* Online (paid) and Offline (unpaid) Book Reviews | Advertising vs. Publicity
* Email Marketing
* Advertorials and Blogging
* Content Syndication and Guest blogging
* HTML Coding for Beginners
* Mobile Marketing
* Pay-per-click (PPC) Advertising
* Search engine optimization SEO
* Social Marketing
* Video Marketing
* And the list goes on!

Authors are entrepreneurs, and T-shaped marketing is every entrepreneur’s friend. The top authors move more books by getting in front of their customers and communicating with them in a clear and consistent manner; and they do this by virtue of social media marketing, blogging, book reviews, email marketing, publicity/media tours, and all the other T-shaped marketing strategies we’ll be discussing. They do what’s necessary to make themselves stand out among all the rest for their particular genres, just as business people do with traditional companies.

The good news is it’s possible! There are examples right before your eyes—right inside these mini ebooks—of successful authors who have used T-shaped marketing to sell THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of books. You can use T-shaped marketing like a pro, too. I’ll show you how.

T-Shaped Marketing for Authors – Inaugural Ebook

Content Syndication Welcome

Kim Staflund: founder and publisher at Polished Publishing Group (PPG) and author of the PPG Publisher’s Blog

A while ago, I shared a post with you regarding the differences between guest posting and content syndication, and how you can use both to improve your search engine ranking: [Guest Blogging and Content Syndication] T-Shaped Marketing for Authors.

In a perfect world, we would all have time to write and post fresh content on our own blog and someone else’s website every single day. If we did this, we would quickly see an increase in our traffic and search engine ranking as a result. But that’s not always possible, so a great way to keep one’s momentum going is through content syndication.

For those of you looking for some great content to post on your own blogs, but who are inundated with other work and just don’t have the time to write fresh content on a regular basis, I’m happy to share the wealth of information contained on the PPG Publisher’s Blog.

YOU CAN FIND EVEN MORE DETAILS ON CONTENT SYNDICATION BY CLICKING ON THIS LINK.

Feel free to use any of the posts you find here. Cut and paste whole or parts of whichever posts you would like to use. Just make sure to always attribute the original source so we don’t get dinged on the SEO front. That’s all I ask. You can do so by ensuring the following message appears at the top or bottom of your post:

This post first appeared on the PPG Publisher’s Blog here:
[insert direct link to the original post]. It has been republished with permission.

Here is a great example of how Alexander von Ness of Nessgraphica used one of my Quora posts on his own blog. Note how he acknowledged the original post at the bottom and also included a direct link to it: Independent Authors Earnings – Three Independent Authors Who are Earning $150,000+ Annually.

One more option for you to consider: add our Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed to your blog/website. You can find a link to it below, on the bottom right-hand side of this blog. Or simply click here to access it: https://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/feed/.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2017 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



[Guest Blogging and Content Syndication] T-Shaped Marketing for Authors

Kim Staflund: founder and publisher at Polished Publishing Group (PPG) and author of the PPG Publisher’s Blog

As I’ve discussed beforehand in a few of my books, the primary reason why blogging is so important is search engine optimization (SEO), which means to improve (optimize) your standing in the organic search results on search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing. Think, for a minute, about when you use a search engine to find something. Where is the first place you look when the search results come up? The top and centre of the page? In addition, how many links are you willing to click through to find what you’re looking for? Maybe ten at the most? Maybe your eye will scan down that first page for something interesting; or, if you have the time, maybe you’ll dig a little deeper and look through the second or third page to see what comes up there. Statistically, most people will stay on the first page. This is why it’s crucial to make sure you (e.g., author name, book title) appear on that first page for as many of the major keywords that are associated with your genre/topic matter as possible. Regular and consistent blogging is one way to help you achieve this.

Two Types of Blogging Can Help You in Different Ways

First and foremost, you can write and post content to your own blog.  When it’s your own blog, you set your own content criteria and can say whatever you want. Your posts can be an obvious advertisement for your products, services, events, et cetera, if you choose; however, it’s important to always provide quality content to your subscribers. The information has to be useful to them if you want to keep them engaged and attract even more subscribers down the road. Blog entries improve your search engine ranking depending on one of the major criteria that search engines are looking for: quantity of posts. Google’s algorithm rewards more points to websites that post new and relevant content on a regular basis.




Secondly, you can post content to someone else’s website that matches well with their content criteria (e.g., you can post articles to an online publication such as EzineArticles.com, or you can guest post on someone else’s blog). The idea is to write several keyword-rich posts—relevant topic matter that contains the phrases your prospective readers will type into a search engine when they are looking for your type of book, and that also contains a link back to your own blog/website— and then share them with others via email and social media websites. Guest posts and online articles such as these will garner higher points for your own blog/website using two additional criteria the search engines are looking for: backlinks and traffic. Backlinks are clickable referrals from one relevant webpage (someone else’s blog or a high-traffic online publication) to another (your own blog). The more backlinks to your blog (and the more traffic that generates for your blog), the higher its point value will be in the eyes of a search engine. As such, the higher it will appear in the organic search results.

A Great Alternative to Guest Blogging: Content Syndication

In a perfect world, we would all have time to write and post fresh content on our own blog and someone else’s website every single day. If we did this, we would quickly see an increase in our traffic and search engine ranking as a result. But that’s not always possible, so a great way to keep one’s momentum going is through content syndication.

In a nutshell, you can offer previously posted content from your own blog to someone else’s high traffic site if it appears to be a great fit for them and you can show them the value in partnering with you in this way.  For more details regarding exactly how syndicating your content works, including how to write a syndication pitch letter to relevant online publications, I highly recommend you read this article by Ritika Puri: Content Syndication: The Definitive, Insider’s Guide. It is a well-written article that should answer all your questions.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2017 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.