Book Distribution Options for Independent Authors

book distribution optionsbook distribution options

book distribution options

Wondering how to distribute your book to your reader base? That all depends on how and where you publish it. In this post, we’ll look at the book distribution options available to independent authors.

Ebook-only Distribution Options

You may not need to produce a paperback version of your book if you plan to distribute it online only. When you publish an .epub through Kobo, or a .mobi through Amazon, your book will only be available through these companies’ online distribution networks.

In Canada, Kobo is partnered with Chapters Indigo. So, when you publish an .epub through Kobo Writing Life, it will show up on both Kobo and Chapters Indigo websites. Books that are published to Amazon through Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), on the other hand, will only be available for sale through Amazon’s ecommerce site.

Digital Book Distribution Options

The term “digital book” can refer to ebooks, paperbacks, and even hardcovers. Online worldwide book distributors, such as Amazon and Ingram Content Group, utilize print-on-demand (POD) technology to sell physical books online. In other words, they won’t print and store any physical copies of your paperback/hardcover book in a large warehouse anywhere.

Instead, they’ll store only the digital cover and interior files that you’ve uploaded to their sites. And they will print, bind, and ship only as many copies as someone buys from them at any given time. Of course, this saves you from having to print any upfront copies whatsoever. If someone goes to their site to buy ten copies of your book, then ten copies will be printed, bound, and shipped to that buyer. If another person buys only one, then they will print, bind, and ship only one—hence the term “print on demand.” This is a definite pro, isn’t it?

Now here are the cons: digital printers can only handle certain trim sizes and paper weights. This limits you to certain book trim sizes, binding types, and paper stocks/colours.

Traditional Distribution Options

If you want your books sold on traditional booksellers’ bookshelves, you must play by the peculiar rules set by the traditional book supply chain. And, believe me, peculiar is the best word to describe these old rules.

As well, most “bricks and mortar” booksellers and libraries will only purchase their books through established distributors such as Ingram Content Group. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis.

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Related reading: Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

Related reading: Why Do Authors Need Graphic Designers?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



3 Reasons Why Reading Helps Writing

Why Reading Helps Writing

Why Reading Helps Writing

If you’ve ever wondered what sorts of writing courses you should take to become a better writer, this post is for you. Here are three reasons why reading helps writing in the most useful ways.

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #1: You’ll Pick Up New Skills

In a recent guest post, one of PPG’s top guest bloggers, Michael LaRocca, talked about why he is a voracious reader. Here’s what he had to say:

I read voraciously, a habit I recommend to any author who doesn’t already have it. You’ll subconsciously pick up on what does and doesn’t work. Characterization, dialogue, pacing, plot, story, setting, description, etc. But more importantly, someone who doesn’t enjoy reading will never write something that someone else will enjoy reading. (LaRocca, 2019)

Even Stephen King agreed with this when he said, “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”

So, maybe you want to pay money for some writing courses. Fair enough. But, perhaps, your first step toward becoming a better writer is simply to pick up some books in your chosen genre and start reading. Start learning that way first.

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #2: You’ll Be Inspired to Write

Whenever I get writer’s block (which we all get sometimes), I read something to cure myself quickly. In fact, writers who spend even as little as half an hour per day reading another person’s work often find that they are more creative during their own writing sessions.

It doesn’t even have to be another book or anything related to your topic matter at all; it can be an online article, magazine, newspaper, or blog. Sometimes, the least likely source can inspire the greatest creativity. The most important point here is to keep yourself open and aware of the infinite pool of ideas all around you. Whatever it takes to get that first sentence out, do it. From there, thoughtful inspiration can—and will—take care of the rest. It always does.

I think this quote by Steven Wright sums it up well: “It usually helps me write by reading — somehow the reading gear in your head turns the writing gear.” So true!

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #3: You’ll Have a Healthier Brain

Here’s an article you may find interesting: This is your brain on Jane Austen, and Stanford researchers are taking notes.

Researchers observe the brain patterns of literary PhD candidates while they’re reading a Jane Austen novel. The fMRI images suggest that literary reading provides “a truly valuable exercise of people’s brains.”

I think we’ve always known this. But now there is scientific proof.

Creativity is similar to muscularity in that it will begin to atrophy with a lack of regular stimulation. Just as even the finest athletes have those days when they must dig a bit deeper to find the will to carry on, all writers will have the same experience. Reading will help you keep your brain healthy which, in turn, will help your writing.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Welcome to My Blog: 10th Anniversary Celebration

Did you know 2019 marks the 10th Anniversary Celebration of the PPG Publisher’s Blog? It’s hard to believe so many years have passed since I wrote my inaugural Welcome to My Blog! post on November 22, 2009. Each month, I’d like to celebrate and recognize the milestones PPG has reached throughout the years, starting with building my website and creating this blog.

10th Anniversary Celebration PPG Publisher's Blog

10th Anniversary Celebration PPG Publisher’s Blog

Today’s website and blog look very different from what I started with 10 years ago. Back then, the theme colours were slate blue and grey as you can see in this video I produced for one of PPG’s first authors, Cheryl Bernard: Welcome to Polished Publishing Group (PPG). I’d also created the PPG Writers’ Forum and an online store to sell PPG books through. But neither of them took off, so I had to let them go a few years ago. C’est la vie!

Welcome to My Blog: 10th Anniversary Celebration

Through the years, I also tried to generate more interest in this blog—this book publishing company as a whole—by creating contests. You Could Win $100,000 in 2012! and You Could Win a Free Publishing Package in 2013! are two early examples. These well-intentioned ideas were intended to generate more social media likes and blog subscribers for PPG. But neither of them made any kind of grand splash in the publishing world. C’est la vie!

What I’ve learned over these past 10 years is that there is no substitute for dedicated work. There is no secret formula to “hack your way to success” quickly and effortlessly. Do you want to be a writer? Then you have to write. Daily. Do you want to be an author? Then you have to push past your fears of sharing the things you’ve written with others. And publish it once and for all. You need to have patience through all the seasons in order to grow The Author’s Money Tree strong and healthy. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned for sure these last 10 years: it’s possible!

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Selling Books Online Has Never Been Easier

Selling books online has never been easier—even for those of you storing boxes of paperbacks/hardcovers in your garages. You can move those books out once and for all. Order fulfillment and shipping is also easier now thanks to Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

Selling books online is made easier with Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

Selling books online is made easier with Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

On this blog, I often discuss ways you can sell more books through strategic blogging and digital publishing. But where does that leave those of you who have already printed a few hundred books that are collecting dust in boxes in your garage?

Selling Books Online is Not Limited to Digital Books

I had coffee with an aspiring author just last week. We were discussing the most effective ways for him to sell his non-fiction idea when he mentioned his father is a poet. Years ago, his father had self-published a poetry collection the old-fashioned way—by printing a few hundred copies of it at a local print shop. He’d held one or two bookstore signings after that and sold 40 or 50 copies to local supporters.

But he was surprised to learn that “bricks and mortar” booksellers and libraries will only purchase books through established distributors. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis. So, like many others, he found himself stuck with several boxes of books, unable to sell them. Nobody had told him it would be this difficult using the traditional book distribution system.

Today’s Book Distribution System Makes Life Easier for Indies

Today, all you need is a website address to direct traffic to and people everywhere can find you. An Amazon ecommerce webpage like this one is perfect. Here, you can write an enticing book description and upload a cover image to promote your title. Then you can simply drive traffic to that webpage from all over your province/country—never mind your local community. And you can rely on Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA) to house and ship those books for you.

But, like anything else, it’s not a simple “set it and forget it” type of system. You can’t just list the book and walk away. You still have to actively drive traffic to that webpage, and strategic blogging is the easiest and most cost-effective way to do it.

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Related reading: [Guest Blogging and Content Syndication] T-Shaped Marketing for Authors

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How to Price a Paperback Book

There are two main things you must consider regarding how to price a paperback book: who is printing the book; who is buying the book. These are your hard costs.

How to Price a Paperback Book

How to Price a Paperback Book

Who is Printing Your Paperback Book?

Any books that are printed using print-on-demand (POD) technology will cost more per unit than books that are printed in large quantities on traditional offset presses. As a result, you’ll have a smaller profit margin on POD books.

Still, it’s important to take advantage of POD in this day and age. It allows your customers to buy your books one at a time on ecommerce sites like Amazon. It also allows independent authors to print small quantities of your books at reasonable prices, as selling opportunities arise. For example, one paperback book may cost around $6 per unit to print on demand digitally.

Traditional offset presses are designed to print larger quantities of books at a lower cost per unit. In fact, they can’t print small quantities economically. It may only cost around $2 per unit to produce 1,000 copies of that same book on an offset press. The downside to printing this many copies is that it requires a large upfront investment. You will also have the added cost/hassle of warehousing all your books.

How to Price a Paperback Book: Printing Options

There’s a time and a place to use each type of printer, which is why PPG returns all working files and finished files to our authors. This allows you to choose if/where you’re going to print your book based on who you’re selling it to:

  • Traditional offset printing: best price for 1000+ copies
  • Standard digital printing: best price for 100 to 999 copies
  • Print-on-demand (POD) digital printing: best price for one to 99 copies

It’s always wise to contact a few printers to obtain quotes for 50, 250, 500, and 1000 books. Make your decision from there.

Who is Buying Your Paperback Book?

On that note, authors who wish to sell copies of your books through local retailers, such as book stores, will also have to factor each retailer’s profit share into your final retail price. Retailers/wholesalers buy publishers’ books at steep discounts in order to turn their own profits. They also expect your title to be marked as “returnable” (for a full refund) in case it doesn’t sell. Here are the industry standards for such discounts:

  • Book Wholesalers (i.e. Ingram, Baker & Taylor, libraries): 50-55% discount
  • Book Retailers (i.e. Chapters, McNally Robinson): 40-45% discount

Once your book has been designed and the final trim size, page count, picture count, and interior (black and white/colour) has been determined, a printer will be able to provide you with the cost per unit to print your book. It is best to factor in the highest possible printing cost (POD) along with the highest possible discount (wholesaler) when determining your book’s retail price. For example, if your POD cost per copy is $4.50, then your retail price should be set at $11.99 minimum as shown here:

How to Price a Paperback Book

How to Price a Paperback Book

Again, these costs are only a small part of the equation when determining the price of a paperback book and should only be used to calculate the lowest possible retail price. You should also do a thorough examination of your audience and what they value most.

Related reading: How to Price an Ebook: A Guide for Independent Authors

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How Long Does Copyright Last?

How long does copyright last after an author passes away? You may be surprised to learn that it’s a little different from country to country. Luckily, I had some help from Ian Gibson, Esq., to answer this question inside my 2014 title How to Publish a Bestselling Book. Here’s an excerpt of his advice.

How Long Does Copyright Last?

Sneak a peek inside for free

How long does copyright last? | Ask Ian Gibson, Esq.

“Pursuant to certain international treaties, the minimum duration of a copyright is generally life of the author plus 50 years. If the work is anonymous or pseudonymous and, thus, the life of the author cannot be determined, the duration of the work will be 50 years from its publication or, if unpublished, its creation. In the case of applied art and photographic works, the minimum term is 25 years from the creation of such a work.

Many countries exceed these minimum standards. In the United States, for example, a work originally created on or after January 1, 1978, by a single author is ordinarily given a term for the author’s life plus an additional 70 years after the author’s death. For more information specific to Canadians, see Kim Staflund’s earlier book, How to Publish a Book in Canada . . . and Sell Enough Copies to Make a Profit!.”

More Valuable Advice from Ian Gibson, Esq.

When it comes to copyright, four primary questions seem to arise most readily: What exactly is copyright? How do I obtain it? How do I protect it? How long does this protection last? This book provides an elementary introduction to international copyright. It was written by an attorney named Ian Gibson who is licensed in the State of California. And it provides you with a solid starting point of reference that answers all of these questions. In fact, Ian even answers this: How does working with a publisher in another country affect my copyright?

That said, for those of you who wish to delve deeper into your own country’s copyright laws, or who require formal legal advice about a specific book project or publishing contract, Ian recommends you consult an experienced attorney licensed in your area. Don’t rely solely on the advice you read in this book.

Related reading: Estate Planning Checklist for Authors

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019

This Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019 is a little early. I’ve had a few set-backs this month that have made me rethink my 2019 goals. Actually, that’s not such a bad thing. I’m glad this education occurred so early in the year.

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019: My Blog Subscribers Aren’t Real Subscribers

Here’s what I’ve learned: WordPress is sneaky in the way it interchanges the words “registered users” (also referred to as team members in WordPress lingo) and “subscribers” (also referred to as followers in WordPress lingo) on its administrative platforms. But it’s important that you never mix up these terms as per CAN-SPAM and CASL laws in North America. Carol Manser wrote a great article about this titled “Registered Users, Subscribers & Logins: What’s the Difference?” Here’s what she has to say about the difference between the two:

If someone Registers on a website, they become Registered Users. Unless the site tells you that you will get some extra privilege for Registering, you will get no extra benefit from Registering.

A common reason why you might want to Register on a website, is Registering on a Forum. You usually have to Register on a Forum before you are allowed to Post questions on the Forum.

If someone Subscribes to a website, they consent to be put onto an Email List in exchange for whatever the website has offered to give them in exchange for their Name and Email Address details. Because of this Consent/Confirmation to receive Emails, Subscribing to a Website is not the same as Registering with a site.

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019: My “Subscribers” Are Only “Registered Users”

It is important to understand that when someone “registers” to your WordPress site, all they’re agreeing to is the right to post comments to your blog as shown in this illustration:

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019 WordPress META

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019 WordPress META

Unfortunately, WordPress lists these registered users as “subscribers” on your blog’s admin area dashboard. Two days ago, I took the below screen shot and felt proud. Why? Because I thought I had 12,272 actual subscribers to my blog:

WordPress Registered Users on Dashboard

WordPress Registered Users on Dashboard

But this wording is inaccurate. Of these 12,272 people (plus me, I’m the Administrator) who are registered to be able to comment on my posts, only nine of them are actual subscribers/followers. Only nine people have specifically signed up to receive updates each time I publish a new post:

Actual Subscribers (Followers)

Actual Subscribers (Followers)

The other 12,263 registered users won’t receive an email update when I post something new. So, they’re not all that useful to me when it comes to my 2019 goals. Why? Because they may never visit my blog again. What I need are actual subscribers—email subscribers—who have signed up specifically to receive email updates from me.

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019: How to Get Real Blog Subscribers

There are a couple of ways to achieve this. First, upon learning this, I immediately replaced the above-shown “META widget” with the following “SUBSCRIBER widget” in my design template:

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019 WordPress Subscribers

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019 WordPress Subscribers

Now, anyone who signs up through this form is showing real interest in my blog content and books. Each time I post something new, he or she will be made aware of it with a personal email. This will dramatically improve my reader engagement (and, hopefully, my book sales) going forward.

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019: Autoresponders Are Even Better

But there is a second, possibly even better, way to collect a growing number of email subscribers who will repeatedly visit both your blog and your books. You will want to use a program called an autoresponder to manage all your email subscribers. MailChimp for WordPress is free for lists up to 2,000 subscribers. After that, depending on the service you use, autoresponders generally cost from $50 per month and up to maintain. It all depends on how many email addresses you are working with.

Through these third parties, such as MailChimp, you can offer additional special discounts or gifts to subscribers on top of the free content already contained on your blog. For example, you can send private newsletters en masse to only these privileged fans regarding online courses or podcasts that constitute some type of added value to them alone. Perhaps, these subscribers will be the only ones to receive discounts on tickets (or back stage passes) to the next book fair you’re speaking at. I think you get the idea. For this to work well, there must be an enticing reason for them to sign up—whatever that reason may be. You choose.

Blogging Progress Report Jan 28 2019: My Revised Goals

Obviously, my goal of reaching 25,000 actual subscribers this year is now a little far-fetched. I’m not starting at 11,1147 followers like I thought I was last month. I’m starting at only nine followers. Ouch! But I plan to reach 5,000 actual subscribers by the end of 2019. I’ll do this by continually driving more traffic to this blog through SEO and my books, as I’ve been doing. My other goals remain the same.

I also plan to increase my free book downloads by 25% this year. By contrast, last year, between the above three ecommerce sites, I saw 4,828 free downloads of my books. In 2019, I want to see an additional 1,207 free books downloaded for a total of 6,035.

Most noteworthy, I plan to increase my paid book downloads by 500% over last year. I saw paid downloads (both ebooks and paperbacks) totalling 83 books from the above three ecommerce sites last year. In 2019, I’m shooting for an additional 417 paid book downloads for a total of 500 this year

Other Changes I Made This Month

I didn’t write as many blog entries as I had planned to this past month because I was busy revamping my old GoDaddy website. I changed it to a WordPress format that matches better with the PPG Publisher’s Blog. Everything is now in place, and it is set up perfectly to help me achieve my goals. I’ll let you know my progress again in the end of February.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Marilyn Monroe Still Captivates Us. Why?

Marilyn Monroe still captivates us. That’s why “Marilyn Monroe” is a fantastic keyword that can bring attention to just about anything. But why?

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe

How many other actresses from the 1950s do you know of with their own Twitter accounts and websites in this day and age? I’ll admit, I’ve watched many documentaries about this woman. I know her life story from start to finish, but I still want to know more.

Why is Marilyn Monroe So Captivating to Men and Women?

Men loved her obvious sex appeal. That one isn’t hard to figure out. But perhaps the most interesting thing about her is that women were (and still are) equally fascinated by her. Not jealous of her breath-taking beauty and allure, but fascinated by it. Addictively attracted to it. To this day, she exemplifies female charisma and beauty to people all around the world.

They say (whoever “they” are) that women from Marilyn’s era felt protective of her. They shared a motherly love of this orphaned girl that, perhaps, grew even deeper due to her tragic and untimely death at only 36 years old.

For me, she’s so much more than that. She is a symbol of possibility and proof that visualization can work for anyone. As legend has it, she would stare outside the window of her orphanage at Beverly Hills and dream of one day becoming a world-famous actress. Who would have thought she could make that kind of grandiose dream come true? But she did.

I wonder if Marilyn Monroe knows that her legend still lives on to this day? I hope she does.

Related reading: James Patterson Shakes The Author’s Money Tree

Related reading: Robert Kiyosaki: The Definition of an Asset

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Finding the Best Way to Write

Finding the Best Way to Write

Finding the Best Way to Write with Michael LaRocca

I read voraciously, a habit I recommend to any author who doesn’t already have it. You’ll subconsciously pick up on what does and doesn’t work. Characterization, dialogue, pacing, plot, story, setting, description, etc. But more importantly, someone who doesn’t enjoy reading will never write something that someone else will enjoy reading.

I don’t write ‘for the market.’ I know I can’t, so I just write for me and then try to find readers who like what I like. I’m not trying to whip up the next bestseller and get rich. Not that I’d complain. Nope, I have to write what’s in my heart, then go find a market later. It makes marketing a challenge at times, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

When you write, be a dreamer. Go nuts. Know that you’re writing pure gold. That fire is why we write.

An author who I truly admire, Kurt Vonnegut, sweats out each individual sentence. He writes it, rewrites it, and doesn’t leave it alone until it’s perfect. Then when he’s done, he’s done.

I doubt most of write like that. I don’t. I let it fly as fast as my fingers can move across the paper or keyboard, rushing to capture my ideas before they get away. Later, I change and shuffle and slice.

James Michener claims that he writes the last sentence first, then has his goal before him as he writes his way to it.

Then there’s me. No outline whatsoever. I create characters and conflict, spending days and weeks on that task, until the first chapter really leaves me wondering ‘How will this end?’ Then my characters take over, and I’m as surprised as the reader when I finish my story.

Some authors set aside a certain number of hours every day for writing, or a certain number of words. In short, a writing schedule.

Then there’s me. No writing for three or six months, then a flurry of activity where I forget to eat, sleep, bathe, change the cat’s litter… I’m a walking stereotype. To assuage the guilt, I tell myself that my unconscious is hard at work. As Hemingway would say, long periods of thinking and short periods of writing.

I’ve shown you the extremes in writing styles. I think most authors fall in the middle somewhere. But my point is, find out what works for you. You can read about how other writers do it, and if that works for you, great. But in the end, find your own way. That’s what writers do.

Just don’t do it halfway.

If you’re doing what I do, writing a story that entertains and moves you, then you will find readers who share your tastes. For some of us that means a niche market and for others it means regular appearances on the bestseller list.

Writing is a calling, but publishing is a business. Remember that AFTER you’ve written your manuscript. Not during.

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I’ve been paid to edit since 1991 and still love it, which has made people question my sanity, but they were doing that before I started editing. I got serious about my writing in 1978. Although I’ve retired more times than Brett Favre, I’m revising my 19th book. Learn more about me at MichaelEdits.com.

© Michael LaRocca 2019



Book Binding: What Are Your Options?

When it comes to your book binding options, you have a few choices: paperbacks, case-wrapped hardcovers (cloth or laminate), or dust-jacketed hardcovers. The below pictures illustrate the differences between them.

Book Binding Option #1: Paperback (Perfect Bound)

paperback

paperback book binding

Last year, PPG had the privilege of publishing the above paperback for a Canadian CFL Champion: Smoke and Mirrors: Life in the CFL with Richie Hall. It’s hard to tell in the picture, but this book has a standard 6″ x 9″ trim size.

Here’s an interesting video that shows you the difference between a perfect bound book and a saddle-stitched book: https://vimeo.com/61195060. Generally, the only time an author would choose saddle-stitching over perfect binding would be if your page count is too low to be able to glue the edge (e.g., from only four to 48 pages). In that case, printers fold the sheets in half and staple them in the centre, instead.

Book Binding Option #2: Case-wrapped Hardcover (Laminate)

case-wrapped laminate hardcover

case-wrapped laminate hardcover book blinding

Above is the best picture I could find of this children’s book PPG published for Denise Geremia back in 2013 titled The Pouty Puppy. Oftentimes, you’ll find children’s books are published as case-wrapped laminate hardcovers like this one. Because it’s more durable and easier to handle for children. Like Richie Hall’s book above, but this book has a standard 6″ x 9″ trim size.

Book Binding Option #3: Dust-jacketed Hardcover (Cloth)

case-wrapped cloth hardcover with dust jacket and paperback

case-wrapped cloth hardcover with dust jacket and paperback book bindings

PPG published the above centennial celebration book back in 2012: 100 Years of Memories: Celebrating Strathmore’s Centennial. As you can see, we did two different versions for this client: a case-wrapped cloth hardcover with a dust jacket; and a paperback. The paperback version was sold online. They are selling the case-wrapped cloth hardcover as a limited-edition book directly from their town hall. (Typically, if you want a dust-jacket around your book, the book itself will be a cloth hardcover as shown above.) Both versions of this book have a special 8.5″ x 8.5″ trim size.

Related reading: Book Trim Sizes: What Are Your Options?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.