Category Archives: Ghostwriting

7 Tips to Help You Write a Book FAST!

What’s the best way to write a book FAST? Should you schedule a chunk of time each day and “force” it out, or is it best to work only when the mood hits? These are common questions that many authors face at the prospect of writing a new book—especially when it comes to “rapid release” publishing. But what if I told you it’s possible to write an ebook in only three weeks?

Write a Book FAST!

Write a Book FAST!

Write a Book FAST With These 7 Tips

The truth is, starting is the easy part. The first few pages and ideas can seem to flow out of your mind faster than your hands can type. This is the most enjoyable stage because it stems from impulsive inspiration, meaning that you’re creating only when the mood hits. Unfortunately, if that mood doesn’t hit on a regular basis, writer’s block can set in.

Creativity is similar to muscularity in that it will begin to atrophy with a lack of regular stimulation. Just as even the finest athletes have those days when they must dig a bit deeper to find the will to carry on, all writers will have the same experience. I’ve found the following tactics effective in getting myself to keep writing on a consistent basis (and QUICKLY!), and I believe they can work for anyone.

Tip 1: Break It Down per Hour

If you already have a full-time job, that means you’ve probably only got two or three hours of writing time available per day during the weekdays; but if you truly want to write a book FAST, then you’ll take at least another six hours per day on the weekends. Over a short three-week period, that will give you 81 writing hours in total.

3 hours X 5 days X 3 weeks = 45 weekday hours
6 hours X 2 days X 3 weeks = 36 weekend hours
45 + 36 = 81 writing hours

Now break it down by hour. How many words can you write in one hour? 100 words per hour will result in an 8,100-word mini ebook at the end of three weeks. 300 words per hour will result in a 24,300-word ebook. 500 words per hour will result in a 40,500-word ebook at the end of three weeks. I don’t want you to get too hung up on the word count because quality is more important to your readers than quantity is. (My mini ebooks, which are equivalent to one chapter of a standard book, are typically from 5,000 to 8,000 words in length whereas my standard, full-length paperback books are generally 40,000+ words in length.)

This simple mathematical exercise has been added here only to demonstrate what you can accomplish in a three-week period. When you break it down like this for yourself, it suddenly appears more achievable, doesn’t it? And when your goal appears more achievable to you, you’ll be more apt to stick with it and see it through to the end.

Tip 2: Schedule Your Time Wisely

Once you’ve planned how many hours per day/week you will commit to writing your ebook, you should actually schedule those hours. Mark them in your calendar just as you would any other important appointment such as client meetings, dental/medical visits, or extra curricular activities.

By scheduling regular writing intervals in this way, you will move past that fleeting, impulsive inspiration toward a more lasting, thoughtful inspiration and finish your book in record speed. Sometimes, when settling down to write, you might have no idea what you’re going to say—and that’s okay. It might take half an hour to get that first awkward sentence out and “unlock the floodgates” of creativity; but most authors are pleasantly surprised with how much they have at the end of each session. It’s because the intention to create is the very thing that attracts the creation. That’s the power of deliberate, thoughtful inspiration.

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.”
~Louis L’Amour

Tip 3: Just Write for Now; Don’t Edit

Here’s another great tip: resist the urge to edit yourself over and over again while you’re writing each day. In fact, don’t edit yourself at all. Your sole purpose, during these three weeks, is to get your ebook written and designed. Period. So, that’s all you should be doing. The editing process will happen after you’re done writing, so you don’t have to worry about it until then.

Creating a truly professional-quality book—including non-fiction how-to books of any kind—is a team effort. The writing portion is typically done within the solitude of one’s imagination and writing room. And then there is the “polishing” portion of the process, which is equally important to your success and requires an outside team of professionals for best results. So, do your part now, and let them do theirs later. You’ll end up with a better book in the end if you do.

Tip 4: Read Regularly

The writers who spend even as little as half an hour per day reading another person’s work often find that they are more creative during their own writing sessions. It doesn’t even have to be another book or anything related to your topic matter at all; it can be an online article, magazine, newspaper, or blog. Sometimes, the least likely source can inspire the greatest creativity. The most important point here is to keep yourself open and aware of the infinite pool of ideas all around you. Whatever it takes to get that first sentence out, do it. From there, thoughtful inspiration can—and will—take care of the rest. It always does.

Tip 5: Ask Yourself These Six Questions

If you’re still having difficulty getting started with a particular chapter after trying all the tips mentioned earlier, then here’s another great idea generator. Write these six questions down underneath that chapter title: Who? What? Why? When? Where? How? Now begin answering each of them for yourself in relation to the topic matter at hand. That should get your creative juices flowing if all else has failed on a particular day.

Tip 6: Reward Yourself Along the Way

It’s important to reward yourself throughout this process because writing a book is an accomplishment all in itself. It deserves your recognition!

What sort of reward will provide you with the greatest sense of motivation to continue forward with your goals? A ticket to a sporting event, concert, or movie at the end of one full week of writing? A particular food item after a certain number of words is written? A visit to the local market or leisure centre? Or, maybe your idea of a treat is a new pair of shoes once you’ve completed the whole book.

Whatever it is, treat yourself. Reward yourself along the way. This is a great way to keep yourself on track and motivated.

Tip 7: One Particularly Helpful Writing Tip

I’ll start by including one of my absolutely favourite quotes about writing by Gary Provost from his book titled 100 Ways to Improve Your Writing: Proven Professional Techniques for Writing with Style and Power (Mentor Series) (a book I highly recommend you read if you’re serious about writing):

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety.

Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

It’s beautiful, isn’t it? It’s like music, as he says. This is the kind of writing that will keep an audience engaged. It not only sings to them; but, with the right combination of vivid adjectives and visceral verbs, it can create such authentic, powerful imagery inside their minds that it keeps them turning the pages for more. That’s really what you’re after whether you’re writing fiction or non-fiction. Don’t you think? Try to make your book as “musical” as possible for best results. Motivate your readers to stay with you by relaying stories, examples, and/or descriptions throughout your book that will appeal to their emotions just as music does, and you’ll surely keep them engaged.

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Collaboration: Mental and Emotional Preparation for the Ghostwriting Process

What is a Ghostwriter?

According to The Free Dictionary by Farlex, a ghostwriter is:

n.
a person who writes a speech, book, article, etc., for another person who is named as or presumed to be the author.
[1895–1900, Amer.]

Ghostwriters are often hired by business professionals who wish to produce books and various other marketing materials to promote their leaders, products, or professional services. A published book can lend credibility to one’s offering if it is done properly. If you want to produce a book that presents you as an industry expert in your field, it should be completed by an industry expert in the book publishing and content writing fields. 

Mental and Emotional Preparation for the Ghostwriting Process

Some authors go into the ghostwriting process with the misconception that, once they’ve handed their notes to the professional, their job is done and the book will be written. Yes, a ghostwriter can save a lot of time in terms of the writing portion itself. But it is important to understand that ghostwriting is an ongoing, collaborative process in which the author will be required to answer questions and proof chapters all along the way.




Authors can also expect to go through a series of emotions during the ghostwriting process. It is natural to feel an initial resistance to each new draft—to feel a bit frustrated if things aren’t worded exactly the way the author first envisioned. This is a natural reaction during the ghostwriting process, particularly when it comes to personal books like biographies. Recognizing this, authors should read a draft over once, and then put it away for a couple of days to give their emotions time to settle. If they do this, it will be easier to read it over again, the next time around, with a more objective mindset. In that objective state, they can then feel free to change the words they don’t like or correct the dates, times, and names however they see fit. All authors make better decisions in the objective state than they do in that initial emotional state.

Analogy for Ghostwriting

A big part of a police officer’s job is to write reports—to try to interpret the recollections of various witnesses and to create the most accurate appraisal of a situation as possible. The biggest challenge in writing this report is that although each witness saw the same thing, they’ll all tend to give the police officer a different account mainly because each of them was viewing it from a different vantage point. An officer can only take what he or she is given and translate it as factually as possible.

Ghostwriters have a similar challenge when it comes to interpreting the notes they receive from authors and trying to turn those words into a veritable yet readable, marketable story. Sometimes, the ghostwriter might interpret some things a bit differently than the author initially intended. That’s okay. It can all be fixed along the way, which is why we say that this is an ongoing, collaborative process—just as the entire hybrid publishing process is. It is a partnership from start to finish. If authors can keep this analogy and these tips in mind throughout the ghostwriting process, they will be more patient with it, which will make it run much more smoothly for them and their writing partner. In the end, they’ll come out of it with an amazing book of which they can both be very proud.

Also read: Working With a Ghostwriter to Write a Book

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Copywriters and Ghostwriters: What They Have in Common

© hobvias sudoneighm

This content first appeared on Digital Point Forum and has been republished here with permission from the author.

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Some people have asked me, “What is the difference between a copywriter and a ghostwriter What are their similarities?”

Well, I’ll start with the primary difference. It’s a simple difference. A copywriter is mainly concerned with producing sales and marketing copy for a client whereas a ghostwriter is someone who writes a book for someone else (whether it be non-fiction or fiction). The term “ghostwriter” simply means that, although they’ve written the book, they remain anonymous (a “ghost”) to that book’s readers because they aren’t listed as the author. The person/organization the book was written for is listed as the author … which is very similar to copywriting, isn’t it? The freelance copywriter rarely, if ever, receives public credit for the content they’ve written for someone else.




Which brings me to even more similarities between these two terms. The list of similarities–what they have in common–comprises much more. Here’s a short list:

1. Both ghostwriters and copywriters produce content for their clients. 
2. As stated above, neither ghostwriters nor copywriters receive public credit for the content they produce for their clients.
3. Both ghostwriting and copywriting are collaborative processes in that these writers need to gain a clear understanding of what their clients want ahead of time before they begin a project, and they may need to edit/correct it along with way once it has been proofread by the client.

There are three points to get that list started. How about if someone else jumps in here and picks up where I left off? What else do these two roles have in common?

Working With a Ghostwriter to Write a Book

What Authors Can Expect During the Ghostwriting Process

When hiring a ghostwriter to help pen a book, it is important for authors to remember this is an ongoing, collaborative process. There are a few ways authors can prepare.

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Some authors are qualified writers and choose to write their own stories. Others choose to hire professional ghostwriters to help them create that compelling narrative. Both are acceptable ways to produce a book. That said, before electing to go with the latter of these two options, there are a few things authors should have prepared ahead of time.

Preparation of Clear Deadline Expectations

Before contacting a ghostwriter with a new book project, it is important for authors to set a clear goal as to when they would like to see their new book in print. Even more crucial: that deadline should be shared with the ghostwriter at the very start of the partnership. This will ensure both parties are headed in the same direction at the same time.

Is this a family history book that must be published and printed before that family reunion in July? Is this a business history book that must be completed in time for a company’s milestone anniversary? Is this a special cookbook or novel or poetry collection that the author wants available in time for Christmas gift giving? These are three common examples of deadlines that must be shared with the ghostwriter ahead of time.

From there, the ghostwriter can backtrack, with the help of the book publisher, to determine how much time is available for the writing, editing, design, proofreading, indexing, and printing stages of the book publishing process in order to meet that deadline.




Preparation of Notes

Book publishing is done electronically in this day and age, so it is important for authors to have access to a computer, the Internet, and email. They should also have a working knowledge of Microsoft Word (for the text portion of their book) and Adobe Acrobat Reader (for viewing .PDF proofs of their designed books down the road).

If a ghostwriter is supplied with various sets of notes that are scrawled on several different sheets of paper, the author’s costs will immediately skyrocket because it will take the ghostwriter extra time to type everything into Microsoft Word from scratch.

If at all possible, it is best (and most cost-effective) for authors to supply all their notes to the ghostwriter in one, continuous Microsoft Word document. The top of this document should include a first draft outline of roughly where they want this book to go and in what order they want each section to appear. From there, the ghostwriter will ask more questions to gain a clearer picture of the author’s vision, and the book will begin to take form.

Mental/Emotional Preparation

Some authors go into the ghostwriting process with the misconception that once they’ve handed their notes to the professional, their job is done and the book will be written. It is important to understand that ghostwriting is an ongoing, collaborative process in which the author will be required to answer questions and proof chapters all along the way.

Authors can also expect to go through a series of emotions during the ghostwriting process. It is natural to feel an initial resistance to each new draft—to feel a bit frustrated if things aren’t worded exactly the way the author first envisioned.

This is a common reaction during the ghostwriting process, particularly when it comes to personal books like biographies. Recognizing this, authors should read a draft over once, and then put it away for a couple of days to give their emotions time to settle. If they do this, it will be easier to read it over again, the next time around, with a more objective mindset. In that objective state, they can then feel free to change the words they don’t like or correct the dates/times/names however they see fit. All authors make better decisions in the objective state than they do in that initial emotional state.

Analogy for Ghostwriting

The perfect analogy for the ghostwriting situation is a police officer interviewing several witnesses to a car accident. Even though every witness saw the same thing, they all gave the police officer a different account … not because they were purposely trying to change the story or be malicious in any way, but simply because they were each viewing it from a different vantage point. They were still being honest and true in their account. The same can be said for a ghostwriter that has to take someone else’s words and interpret them and write them into a readable, marketable story.

If authors can keep this analogy and these tips in mind throughout the ghostwriting process, then it will run much more smoothly for them and their writing partner. In the end, they will come out of it with an amazing book they can both be very proud of.

This article was originally published at Suite101 in February 2010.

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