Category Archives: Copyright

Digital Rights Management (DRM) for Authors

Digital Rights Management (DRM) is a term you may come across when publishing an ebook. When you apply DRM to a file, you protect it from Internet piracy.

Digital Rights Management (DRM)

Digital Rights Management (DRM)

I’m a strong proponent of applying DRM to all the books you publish online. I urge you to avoid the websites that publish PDF files alone. This is because PDF files are far too easy to duplicate and share. Pretty much anyone can download and attach your PDF file to an email and send it to another person. You can imagine how quickly a file can spread that way.

Digital Rights Management (DRM) of MOBI Ebooks

Amazon (Kindle) uses a file format known as MOBI to publish ebooks online. This is a much safer format to publish your ebook in. It can only be read on certain devices (e.g., Kindle readers). As shown in the image above, you can choose whether to apply DRM to your Kindle MOBI file. Doing so provides an extra layer of protection by preventing others from copying and pasting the text from your file. Instead, it becomes a read-only document on the Kindle reader.

Digital Rights Management (DRM)

Digital Rights Management (DRM)

Digital Rights Management (DRM) of EPUB Ebooks

Kobo, and most other ebook publishers, use a more common file format known as EPUB. Again, Kobo gives you a choice as to whether or not you apply DRM to each ebook you upload to their website. It’s the same deal as it is with Amazon’s Kindle. Doing so provides you with an extra layer of protection against the Internet pirates.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

The best way to prevent other people from stealing your book is to protect your copyright ownership. You protect it by proving you’re the true copyright owner right from the very first written draft. There are a few simple ways you can do this.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book Before it is Published?

Every time you sit down to write a portion of your book, email that evening’s work to yourself. Send it to two or three private, secure email addresses. Save it on a USB drive, too. This not only backs up everything you’ve written so you always have access to it, even in the event of a computer crash. It also acts as date-stamped proof of your copyright ownership all along the way.

Here’s another great way to get this evidence of copyright ownership—a way that is virtually free of charge. It’s as simple as sealing a copy of your completed work in an envelope and mailing it back to yourself via registered mail. When the date-stamped package is returned to you, keep it sealed and stored in a fireproof container. Then, in the highly unlikely event that someone else ever tries to claim copyright ownership of your work after the fact, you will have more date-stamped proof of your ownership to fall back on.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book During the Publication Process?

The likelihood of any professional editor, designer, or proofreader stealing your manuscript is very low. But, for those of you who are concerned about this, I recommend hiring reputable help you know you can trust.

A great site to find freelancers of all kinds, with all experience levels, from all over the world, is UpWork.com. You can browse through the talent already listed there. Get a sense of what their hourly or flat fee rates are. Or you can post your own job, timeline, and payment expectations to see who replies and take it from there. I’ve personally used this site as a freelancer. I can tell you there are many checks and balances in place to ensure the freelancers you’re hiring are exactly who they say the are.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book After it is Published?

This is where things get a little more involved. When it comes to copyright infringement, the laws and remedies vary per each country. Click here to read some important advice from a trademark, copyright, and entertainment attorney free of charge.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Estate Planning Checklist for Authors

Estate Planning Checklist for Authors

Estate Planning Checklist for Authors

Anyone who has been reading this blog (or my non-fiction publishing guides) for a while knows about my sales background. I’ve worked in various positions—mainly print advertising sales—over the years while building my authorship on the side. After being laid off from one of those common jobs, I was certified to sell prepaid funeral and cemetery services. I did that for a short time. Now, some of you may find that career path a bit odd or morbid. But I have to say it was an eye-opening education for me. I’m so glad I did it, because I learned so much. It is so important for everyone to have an estate planning checklist completed for the family members they leave behind. It is equally—if not more—important for authors to plan ahead in this way.

The Standard Estate Planning Checklist for Everyone

When a loved one passes away, there are so many decisions to make and things for family members to do. If it’s a sudden passing and that person didn’t leave any instructions regarding his or her wishes, it can be especially traumatic. Unexpected upfront funeral and cemetery expenses can leave family members strapped for cash. They may have difficulties locating important banking or insurance information to cover those expenses. They may be unaware of who all to invite to the celebration of life. The list goes on, so it makes sense to plan ahead. In the very least, everyone should take care of the following three details and let family members know where to find them:

  1. Draft a will that includes who will be named the executor, beneficiary, and trustee/legal guardian (if young children are left behind) of your estate. It is also wise to stipulate a power of attorney in the event you are disabled in any way that prevents you from making decisions for yourself while still alive.
  2. Attach a list of employment, mortgage, banking, and insurance contact information that is easy for family members to follow.
  3. A contact list of those who should be called to attend your life celebration is also great to include. This list is important even if you aren’t preplanning/prepaying your own funeral and cemetery arrangements. It can make things a lot easier for your loved ones to ensure everyone you cared about is aware of your passing.

An Author’s Estate Planning Checklist

Estate Planning Checklist

Estate Planning Checklist

Authors have another important list to include with their wills: all your titles in publication. It’s wise to include where you published each title through (e.g., the name of the publishing house, distributor, or ecommerce site). It’s also important to include all possible editions (e.g., paperbacks, hardcovers, ebooks, audiobooks) and any contracts you have in place for subsidiary rights.

Why are these things important? M.L. Buchman explains it well in his book Estate Planning For Authors: Your Final Letter (and why you need to write it now) (Strategies for Success) (Volume 2). One important take-away is this: your book’s copyright outlives you by 50 years in Canada, 70 years in the United States. Did you know that? Assuming you self-published and retained 100% of your book’s copyright ownership, this means your estate will still be paid royalties for ongoing sales. Your beneficiaries could still potentially earn a living from your work many years after you pass on. So, you will want to give them instructions regarding how you want your intellectual property managed after you’re gone. I recommend picking up a copy of M.L. Buchman’s book for more details on how to go about this. It’s important, not only for you but for your loved ones.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Why is Copyright Important?

Or, more specifically, why is copyright important to an author’s success? That’s the real question, and there are a few answers. But first, we need to understand what copyright is. Here’s a description taken from Frequently Asked Questions About ISBNs, Copyright, and Book Publishing in General:

Merriam-Webster described copyright as a “Noun: The exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute the matter and form of something (as a literary, musical, or artistic work).”

How Do I Copyright My Own Work?

copyright important

copyright important

As the original creator of your manuscript, you own 100 percent of all of the rights to reproduce, publish, sell, and distribute your words in whatever manner you see fit. Your manuscript belongs to you and you alone—from the moment you write it. It is only when you decide that you want to publish your manuscript into book format with the hopes that you’ll earn some money (or educate people, or entertain people, or whatever your personal reasoning is for publishing it) that the copyright ownership of that work might shift to someone else, depending on which publication method you choose.

Why is My Ownership of Copyright Important?

I recently published a free ebook titled Your Ebook is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright that I recommend you read in full because it provides more detail than this post. It can be downloaded from Amazon, Kobo, or E-Sentral. Here is what you need to know.

Your Ebook is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright

Your Ebook is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright

Once your published book becomes popular, you will begin to see the true value of copyright ownership. This is when more business people may come knocking and asking to buy additional subsidiary rights to that work. Maybe someone will want to purchase the exclusive Bengali and Hindi translation rights to your work so he or she becomes the only one who can reproduce, print, and distribute it in these languages in India for a profit. Maybe others will want to buy the exclusive motion picture rights so that they can adapt your book for film. Imagine how much money the licensee must have paid (and earned!) for all the Harry Potter merchandise that was created and sold as an offshoot of that successful book series—never mind all the profits that were earned from the motion picture sales.

You can “divvy up” the rights to a work in so many ways that it would be impossible to list them all here, but this gives you a very basic idea. It is simplified to provide an easier understanding. It also shows you the income potential of your book past royalty earnings alone. This is why copyright is so important to an author’s success. Read the book. It will open your eyes to your potential.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



When Should Writers opt for Self-Publishing over Traditional (Trade) Publishing?

When should writers opt for self-publishing over traditional (trade) publishing? This is a loaded question because the answer might be different for one person than it is for another. It all starts with your own personal preferences and goals as detailed in this blog post from a while back: Ten Questions To Ask Yourself Before Publishing Your Book. From there, it’s important to research the various publishing options available to you to determine which one best complements your goals. I talk about these three book publishing business models in one of my most recent free downloads titled Your Ebook is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright. Here is a brief excerpt from that ebook:

Some authors will submit their manuscripts to a traditional (trade) publisher for consideration in the hopes it will be published for them free of charge. What they might not realize is that whoever is paying for the publication of a book is the one who ends up with primary control over that book. Trade publishers don’t pick up the bill simply out of the kindness of their hearts. They are business people who are buying a product to try to turn a profit for themselves, and that “product” is the copyright ownership of your work (whether permanent or temporary, whether full or partial—it varies with each contract and each publisher).

The grant of rights clause in a publishing contract is one of the most important clauses because it enumerates the specific rights granted to the publisher by the author. Negotiation of this clause has become even more important in today’s world where increasingly more uses are being developed for literary content.

The scope of the clause may vary widely, it could be all inclusive — granting all the exclusive rights and interests in the author’s work, or the grant could be very narrow — only including a single specific use of the author’s work, or it could be somewhere between these extremes. The critical point is that the publisher only has the right to exploit those rights that are specifically granted to the publisher and any exploitation of rights exceeding the author’s grant could be deemed a copyright infringement of the author’s work.

Copyright ownership of a literary work consists of a bundle of rights which an author, at least theoretically, may assign to the publisher in any manner they choose. Thus, an author may assign all or only a part of his/her rights to one or more publishers while retaining particular rights for himself/herself. (Thomson Reuters, n.d.)

Unfortunately, many authors unwittingly grant all their exclusive rights to one publisher without fully understanding the implications of doing so. As a result, these individuals usually retain only basic rights that recognize them as the author of the work and allow them to be paid a small percentage of its retail price in royalties (usually only up to 10 percent per copy sold). The publisher keeps the rest of the profits because the publisher owns the copyright.

Most trade publishers do not ask for an outright assignment of all exclusive rights under copyright; their contracts usually call for copyright to be in the author’s name. But it’s another story in the world of university presses. Most scholarly publishers routinely present their authors with the single most draconian, unfair clause we routinely encounter, taking all the exclusive rights to an author’s work as if the press itself authored the work: “The Author assigns to Publisher all right, title and interests, including all rights under copyright, in and to the work…”

…The problem is that most academic authors—particularly first-time authors feeling the flames of “publish or perish”—don’t even ask. They do not have agents, do not seek legal advice, and often don’t understand that publishing contracts can be modified. So they don’t ask to keep their copyrights—or for any changes at all. (The Authors Guild, n.d.)

If you choose to follow the traditional route toward publishing a book, you must read and fully understand the contract being presented to you before signing anything away. You should only grant a publishing company the primary and subsidiary rights that it has the full intention (and capability) of exploiting on your behalf so the relationship benefits you both. If any publisher ever tries to tell you otherwise, then walk away.

Interested in reading more about your other two options? You can download a free copy of Your Ebook is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright from your choice of either Amazon, Kobo, or E-Sentral to continue reading. Click on the link for details.



Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About ISBNs, Copyright, and Book Publishing in General

Kim Staflund: founder and publisher at Polished Publishing Group (PPG) and author of the PPG Publisher’s Blog

Many of your questions regarding PPG-specific policies and procedures will be answered by clicking on the above links and visiting the various other pages on this blog. For general book publishing questions and answers, please read below.

What is an ISBN?

“ISBN” stands for “International Standard Book Number.” An ISBN is a unique 13-digit identifier for each edition of your book. For example, the paperback version of your book will have one ISBN, the hardcover version will have another, and the ebook version will have yet another. An ISBN is required for all books being produced for commercial use with Amazon as an exception. Amazon attaches its own unique ASINs to the ebooks uploaded to its site. ASIN stands for Amazon Standard Identification Number.

Each country in this world should have its own national ISBN agency where the authors/publishers from that region can obtain ISBNs for their books. You can find your closest agency via the International ISBN Agency by visiting this link: https://www.isbn-international.org/agencies.

What is copyright?

Merriam-Webster described copyright as a “Noun: The exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute the matter and form of something (as a literary, musical, or artistic work).”

How Do I Obtain Copyright Ownership of My Work?

As the original creator of your manuscript, you own 100 percent of all of the rights to reproduce, publish, sell, and distribute your words in whatever manner you see fit. Your manuscript belongs to you and you alone—from the moment you write it. It is only when you decide that you want to publish your manuscript into book format with the hopes that you’ll earn some money (or educate people, or entertain people, or whatever your personal reasoning is for publishing it) that the copyright ownership of that work might shift to someone else, depending on which publication method you choose.

Click here to sneak a peek inside for answers to even more FAQ!

By publishing your book through PPG, your copyright ownership will remain intact. We ensure it. It’s written into your publishing agreement and all other work-made-for-hire agreements we create for the various vendors (e.g., editors, designers, proofreaders, et cetera) who work on your project.

How Do I Protect My Copyright?

This is, perhaps, the real question writers are asking when they refer to the copyright of their books, and the answer is simple: You protect it by proving that you are the true copyright owner of the work. This can be done free of charge simply by sending yourself a copy of the manuscript via date-stamped registered mail and storing that sealed envelope in a fireproof/waterproof container.

How Long Does Copyright Last?

Each country is a little different; but, as a general rule, copyright lasts for the life of the author, the remainder of the calendar year in which the author dies, and for 50 (or more) years following the end of that calendar year. 

Additional Questions and Answers

Click here to sneak a peek inside for answers to even more FAQ!

How Does Working with a Publisher in Another Country Affect My Copyrights?

Is Quoting Another Author’s Work in My Book Copyright Infringement?

You can find answers to these additional copyright questions inside How to Publish A Bestselling Book … and Sell It WORLDWIDE Based on Value, Not Price! from an actual trademark, copyright and entertainment attorney named Ian Gibson, Esq..

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Learn at Your Own Pace: Online Courses in Writing, Publishing, and Selling Books

Through Udemy‘s online learning portal, PPG can help you build on your book writing, publishing, and selling skills from the comfort of your home and at your own pace. Here are just three of the courses that can help you with every aspect of your next book project from start to finish:


ONLINE COURSE: Writing A Book: The First Draft


ONLINE COURSE: Writing With Flair: How To Become An Exceptional Writer


ONLINE COURSE: Self-Publishing Success in Bookstores and Online!

Check them out today. Just click on the above pictures to be redirected to the course landing page where you can enroll and start learning immediately. Good luck and enjoy.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2017 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



What Could Surrendering Your Copyright Potentially Cost You?

Kim Staflund: founder and publisher at Polished Publishing Group (PPG) and author of the PPG Publisher’s Blog

Kim Staflund: founder and publisher at Polished Publishing Group (PPG) and author of the PPG Publisher’s Blog

The CEO Magazine recently published a piece I wrote for their 8020 Blog titled Your Book is an Asset … if You Own the Copyright, and it generated many comments from both authors and publishers alike … some more passionate than others. Many thought it was too simplified, as though a more complicated explanation of copyright is somehow more acceptable. I disagree, hence this additional blog post on the topic.

Here is my personal belief: when people are unable to explain their topic matter to others in layman’s terms with ease, then they are either hiding something or they don’t fully understand it themselves. This is why I’m cautious when it comes to publishing contracts that are filled with complicated legalese. It is also why I challenge those who try to defend such contracts by saying, “It’s not that simple. There are different types of licenses. There are several factors to consider. Authors may be relinquishing some of their control, but not necessarily their copyright; or, if they are giving up their copyright, it may be only temporarily, not permanently.” And on and on.

Semantics. Legalese is confusing by design. I could utilize immoderately byzantine phraseology and labyrinthine reasoning with the best of them if I chose to, but that rather defeats the purpose of communication, don’t you think? 

I’d rather be clear and helpful. So, let’s keep it simple. Because, at the end of the day, it’s unnecessary to complicate this.

COPYRIGHT SIMPLIFIED (UNDERSTANDING PUBLISHING CONTRACTS)

  cop·y·right
/ˈkäpēˌrīt/

  noun
noun: copyright; plural noun: copyrights
1. the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film,   or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.
“he issued a writ for breach of copyright”
* a particular literary, artistic, or musical work that is covered by copyright.

  adjective
adjective: copyright
1. protected by copyright.
“permission to reproduce photographs and other copyright material”

  verb
verb: copyright; 3rd person present: copyrights; past tense: copyrighted; past participle:
copyrighted; gerund or present participle: copyrighting
1. secure copyright for (material).

As the original creator of your manuscript, you own 100 percent of all of the rights to reproduce, publish, sell, and distribute your words in whatever manner you see fit. Your manuscript belongs to you and you alone—from the moment you write it. It is only when you decide that you want to publish your manuscript into book format with the hopes that you’ll earn some money (or educate people, or entertain people, or whatever your personal reasoning is for publishing it) that some or all of the copyright ownership of that work might shift to someone else, depending on which publication method you choose. In other words, you might take a few different routes toward having your book published, and each of these book publishing methods affects your copyright ownership a little differently.

It is vitally important that you review a publishing contract in full before you ever sign it; and, if the contract before you is filled with a bunch of hard-to-understand language, then ask the questions you need to ask to ensure that you fully understand the agreement you’re about to enter into. Hold the company accountable for explaining it to you and putting you at ease. You have that right as one of their clients.




TRADITIONAL (TRADE) PUBLISHERS

Some authors will submit their manuscripts to a traditional (trade) publisher for consideration in the hopes that it will be published free of charge to them. What they might not realize is that whoever is paying for the publication of a book is the one who ends up with primary control over that book. Trade publishers don’t pick up the bill simply out of the kindness of their hearts. They are business people who are buying a product to try to turn a profit for themselves, and that “product” is the copyright ownership of your manuscript (whether permanent or temporary, whether full or partial—it varies with each contract and each publisher).

And fair enough! If I was paying for the whole thing, assuming all financial risk and responsibility for the project myself, then I would want majority control and ownership, too. That’s the only way I would be able to earn a decent return on my investment. So, this isn’t a criticism of the publishing model itself. It’s simply intended to educate authors about the true implication of publishing through this type of publisher. If someone else is paying for it, they own it. They control it. Plain and simple.

In this business model, writers usually retain only the basic publishing rights that recognize them as the author of the book and allow them to be paid a small percentage of the retail price in royalties (usually only up to 10 percent per copy sold, but it varies). The trade publisher keeps the rest of the profits because the trade publisher owns the book. Thus, as the owner of the book, that trade publisher also reserves the right to sell off additional reproductive (a.k.a. subsidiary) rights for additional profit down the road.

VANITY PUBLISHERS (UNSUPPORTED SELF-PUBLISHING FOR “INDIE” AUTHORS)

Authors who choose the vanity publishing route usually retain 100 percent ownership of their written words; however, if the vanity publisher has produced the cover artwork for them, (nine times out of ten, in my personal experience) that company usually retains the copyright of that artwork. This means that authors must always go through the vanity publisher to have their marketing materials and books printed.

A contract with a vanity publisher will usually also give that publisher non-exclusive online distribution rights throughout North America, the United Kingdom, Europe, and possibly the whole world. All this means is that the publisher reserves the right to sell and distribute copies of the book through its various channels for the duration of the contract; however, this is a non-exclusive contract; therefore, the author (and any other distributor designated by the author) is also free to sell copies of the book within those regions. If it were an exclusive contract, only the publisher would be allowed to sell the book online within those regions.

HYBRID PUBLISHERS (PROFESSIONALLY SUPPORTED SELF-PUBLISHING)

Last but not least, authors can also choose to publish through a supportive self-publishing house (a.k.a. hybrid publisher) where they will retain 100 percent copyright ownership of both their words and their artwork. Much like the contracts with vanity publishers, a contract with a supportive self-publishing house would also include non-exclusive online distribution rights worldwide for a specified term. This gives the authors much greater exposure without limiting their ability to sell wholesale author copies on their own wherever they choose to sell them.




WHAT COULD SURRENDERING YOUR COPYRIGHT POTENTIALLY COST YOU?

Eventually, once you’re selling lots of books and making a name for yourself with the general population, you’ll begin to see the true value of retaining majority (i.e., FULL!) copyright ownership—because this is when more business people will come knocking and asking to buy additional reproductive rights to your book. Maybe someone in Quebec will want to purchase the exclusive French language rights to your title so he or she can be the only one to reproduce, print, and distribute it in French to that region’s Francophone population for a profit. Maybe others will want to buy the exclusive North American film rights so that they can adapt the book for film in this region.

You can “divvy up” the rights to a book in so many different ways that it would be impossible to list them all here, but this gives you a very basic idea. It is simplified to provide an easier understanding.

What are all these rights worth? In any industry, a thing is worth what someone will pay for it. It could be worth millions to the primary owner of the book, so it’s a good idea to retain as much, if not ALL, of that ownership as you can right from the start. Then, when the movie producers and foreign publishers start calling, hire an intellectual property attorney to help you determine the best price for each sale of rights to each different buyer.

“I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU” BY DOLLY PARTON … A PRICELESS COPYRIGHT

Whether you’ve written a book, a movie script, or a song, the value of retained copyright ownership is much the same. It’s all intellectual property that can generate additional income through the sale of subsidiary rights.

Most, if not all of us are familiar with Whitney Houston’s cover of Dolly Parton’s song titled “I Will Always Love You.” What you may not be aware of is that, as the copyright owner of that song, Dolly gets paid each time a copy of it is made. She doesn’t have to lift a finger, and she gets paid.

Millions of copies of Whitney Houston’s cover of that song were made. And Dolly got paid on every one of them.

Retained copyright ownership of your intellectual property is potentially priceless. It doesn’t get any simpler than that.

Related reading: Your Intellectual Property is Priceless! 

Related reading: Authors, Keep Your Copyrights. You Earned Them. 

Related reading: Managing Intellectual Property in the Book Publishing Industry

Related reading: Copyright Ownership: Who Owns What?

Related reading: Subsidiary Rights: Acquisition & Licensing

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2016 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Change is the Only Constant: Welcome to the New PPG Publisher’s Blog!

Coming soon! Watch for this new book around the world in early August 2014!

Coming soon! Watch for this new book around the world in early August 2014!

First and foremost, thank you to every PPG Publisher’s Blog subscriber for your patience while we transitioned from one blog service provider to another when the former discontinued this particular product from their offering. (Such is life on the Internet.) And hello to all the new subscribers who have joined us here. Glad to have you on board!

While it’s taken me a little while to get back into the swing of things on this blog, not to worry! I haven’t forgotten you; and, in fact, I’ve still been writing much helpful content regarding book publishing, sales, and marketing to help you all succeed with your own books.

As you already know, in 2013 I launched How to Publish a Book in Canada . . . and Sell Enough Copies to Make a Profit! to address the frequently asked questions that are specific to Canadian individuals and businesses that wish to publish their work. This book was (and continues to be) a tremendous learning tool for many—so much so that it became a bestseller on Amazon within its first month and a half and has spawned even more questions from aspiring authors all across North America and even “across the pond” in the United Kingdom and other parts of Europe. You’ve asked and the Polished Publishing Group (PPG) has listened. Introducing How to Publish a Bestselling Book . . . and Sell It WORLDWIDE Based on Value, Not Price! which has been written for all the aspiring authors and business professionals who wish to produce a book that presents you as professional writers and industry experts within your fields.




Whether you’re writing a fictional novel, a cookbook, or a “how to” book, publishing a book is a business venture. All authors are entrepreneurs. And the first thing every entrepreneur should ask himself or herself is this: do I offer the best value in my field, or do I offer the best price? This is a vitally important question to ask of yourself before you begin the publishing process of your book. Why? Because, if you offer the best value in your field, you need to promote your business (and everything related to it—including your book!), using value-based selling. If you offer the best price, you need to promote your book using price-based selling. Consistency is the key to long-term success no matter what industry you’re in.

This new book, due to be published around the world in early August 2014, contains answers to pretty much every question you could possibly have about how to publish and sell a truly professional-quality book all around the world. Further to that, it contains an elementary introduction to international copyright (graciously written for us by Ian Gibson, Esq., an attorney who is licensed in the State of California) to provide aspiring authors with a solid starting point of reference that answers all of your basic copyright questions and a couple more, including, “How does working with a publisher in another country affect my copyright?”

By the time you’re done reading this book, hopefully you’ll have gained some valuable insight into what it truly takes to produce a saleable book and how to market it to your desired demographic. Better yet, you’ll have all the tools you need to get that book into the hands of those desired customers all around the world, land on a coveted bestseller list in your area, and earn a healthy profit in the process. That is my wish for you.

Sincerely,

Kim Staflund
Founder and publisher of Polished Publishing Group (PPG)

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: https://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Self-Publishing versus Supported Self-Publishing

So, you’re looking at taking the self-publishing route. This is a wise decision in terms of maintaining copyright ownership of your book. Here at PPG, we agree with your choice wholeheartedly.

One suggestion, if you do decide to go this alone, is that you have a detailed conversation with whichever graphic designer you choose to work with to ensure you’re maintaining copyright ownership of your book cover in addition to the story itself. Many times, graphic designers assume they will keep the copyright ownership of whatever artwork they create on your behalf, and authors unwittingly agree to this simply because they didn’t know to have the conversation upfront, and/or they didn’t put a proper contract in place with that designer. I already talked about this a bit in an earlier blog entry titled Who Owns The Artwork? In the comments section of this blog entry, you’ll see many replies from graphic designers who believe they should be paid significant amounts of money if they are expected to give up their rights. This is more common than you may think and can cause problems for authors. By working with PPG, you will eliminate this problem altogether because we only hire artists who agree with our stance on copyright ownership: it belongs to the paying author.

One of the biggest benefits of allowing a company like PPG to be your personal project manager throughout the self-publishing process is that we already have all of these types of contracts in placewith experienced professional copy editors, designers, proofreaders, and indexersand these contracts have all been written to protect the copyright ownership of the self-publishing author. Another benefit is that we have already pre-screened all these people on your behalf. We make sure they all have at least five years’ experience in their respective fields. Because of this, you can be assured that you will end up with trade publisher quality at the end of this publishing process. And that’s what you wantyou want professional quality if you expect to compete in the marketplace against other trade quality books.

Another benefit to working with PPG is that we’ve been through this publishing process several times over, so we’ve fine-tuned the process to ensure it runs as quickly and seamlessly for you as possibleto get your book out to the public sooner than you can on your own. We negotiate all the contracts and take care of the administrative aspect of everything on your behalf so you can focus on the writing and marketing. This is a huge advantage as there is so much to do, and the task can become quite overwhelming and daunting along the way when doing it alone.

Whatever you decide, we wish you all the success in the world. And, if you do decide to work with PPG, we will be honoured to support you in self-publishing your professional-quality book.

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: https://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.