Monthly Archives: February 2019

Why did my paperback print in a different colour than what I saw on the computer screen?

Why did my paperback print in a different colour than what I saw on the computer screen? Colours are much more complicated than you may realize. How something looks on your computer screen may look completely different in printed format. There are many different reasons why.

Why did my paperback print in a different colour than what I saw on the computer screen?

Why did my paperback print in a different colour than what I saw on the computer screen?

RGB versus CMYK Colours

For starters, RGB (red, green, blue) colours are what you see on your computer screen. They are created using light. CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) colours are created by mixing inks/toners together in varying percentages.

When you are creating an ebook only, it’s okay to use RGB colours in your design. But if you plan to also print a paperback or hardcover version of your book, you should design it using CMYK colours. Otherwise, your printer may not be able to match the colours you’ve chosen since printers have a smaller colour gamut available than computer screens do.

Coated Paper Versus Uncoated Paper

Yet another thing that can affect the way your colour will appear after it’s printed is paper stock. In fact, the same colour can look completed different when it is printed on coated paper versus uncoated paper. I show examples of this inside 3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors: Consider This Before Printing Any Books.

Digital Colour Versus Offset Colour

A digital printer is what every business has in its office. These printers use dry toner rather than liquid ink and can run smaller quantities at a cost-effective price. An offset printing press is “old-school printing” in that it uses liquid ink, is the most cost-effective option for higher print quantities, and generally offers better colour control than today’s digital printers do.

Another thing that can affect how your colour appears in print is the type of printer being used. Digital prints will usually appear more “shiny” and bright whereas offset prints will appear slightly duller. This is because toner is glossy whereas ink is not.

Related reading:
Why Do Authors Need Graphic Designers?

Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



What is Vanity Publishing?

What is vanity publishing? Vanity publishing is one of the three options today’s authors have available to help you publish a book. But this option doesn’t have a good reputation. Today’s post discusses why that’s the case and what you can do to improve your book’s image.

What is vanity publishing?

What is vanity publishing?

You have three different book publishing options available to you: traditional trade publishing; vanity (unsupported self-publishing); and hybrid (professionally supported self-publishing). For a clear understanding of the pros and cons of each, I recommend you download this free ebook. It’s a short book. You should be able to read it in under two hours.

What is Vanity Publishing?

The vanity book publishing model was introduced as an alternative for writers who were tired of waiting around to be accepted by traditional book publishers. They had, instead, decided to self-publish their books themselves. As noble as the vanity publishers’ intentions might be, they are the least respected book publishing alternative of them all within publishing circles (i.e., traditional publishers, reviewers, booksellers, and distributors). With good reason.

These companies are more aptly described as book printers than publishers. They’ve earned their notoriety by accepting and printing 100 percent of the manuscripts that are submitted to them. Little consideration is given to the quality of your book—the opposite extreme of trade publishing. A vanity publisher will take what it receives and print it as is, matter what it looks like.

Vanity Publishing is Unsupported Self-Publishing

Some of these companies run a “self-service” type of operation using a selection of generic template builders. This allows self-publishing authors to upload book files online (or via email) and then draft them into ebooks or paperbacks.

Other vanity publishers are simply printers with in-house design staff. They will take your raw materials (e.g., manuscript, graphics) and do all that formatting for you for a fee. Then they’ll print however many copies you want printed.

There is No Editing Included

Both vanity publishing options share one commonality: although their staff might be knowledgeable about printing and electronic file formatting, they are wholly unseasoned when it comes to the essential publishing practices (such as professional editing, graphic design, and proofreading) that ensure the polished result every serious author is after. Vanity publishers never actively encourage their clients to improve the quality of their work in any way. This lack of improvement is truly a disservice to the serious-minded authors who wish to present themselves as professionals.

Best for Personal Gratification (Hence the “Vanity” Reference)

For those who wish to publish your books solely for personal gratification, then the vanity book publishing route is probably the best one to take. This is a great option for family history books, scrapbooks intended as gifts for loved ones, and other non-commercial projects.

If you wish to sell your book commercially, then you’ll need to produce a more professional product. Copy editing is a crucial step in helping you to achieve this. But there are ways to produce your book economically. Click here for details.

Related reading: Sneak a peek inside How to Publish a Bestselling Book for even more details on your publishing options.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How Much Does It Cost to Publish a Book?

How Much Does It Cost to Publish a Book?

How Much Does It Cost to Publish a Book?

One of the first questions every author has is: how much does it cost to publish a book? Well, that depends. What type of book do you wish to publish (e.g., ebook, paperback, hardcover)? Where and how do you want it distributed (e.g., online and/or traditional distribution networks)?

For a full list of the questions you should be asking and answering for yourself, I recommend you click on the Book Publishing Quote link in the top menu of this page and read through it. Once you’ve done that, you’ll know which of the two below options most applies to you and your particular book project.

How Much Does It Cost to Publish a Book Economically?

The fact is, traditional book publishing methods don’t work well for everyone. More and more, I come across people who want to publish a book for all kinds of different reasons—to promote a business, fulfill a lifelong dream, commemorate a special occasion, et cetera—and they want it done quickly (e.g., within four to six weeks), and with a minimal upfront investment.

These are the people who would rather utilize online algorithms to grow their readership than spend any amount of money on traditional forms of book promotion. These authors also want full control over their own creative processes and release dates, and they’re fine with selling their books online only.

For a long time, I resisted this idea. I held to my belief that it’s impossible to produce a quality book within such a short time period, and especially without the support of a full professional publishing team. But then, one evening, while I was researching bestselling strategies for authors, I came across a Forbes article that began to shift my thinking. I learned the strategies today’s top independent authors are using to self-publish and sell massive quantities of books online. With this step-by-step program designed specifically for do-it-yourselfers, your only cost will be copy editing. That’s it, that’s all.

How Much Does It Cost to Publish a Book Professionally?

For those of you who wish to produce a professional-quality book than can be sold both online and through the traditional book supply chain, you’ll require the support of a full book publishing team behind you. Here is a list of the various costs associated with hiring such a team. These prices may vary depending on whether you use a project manager or hire your own editors, designers, et cetera, to work with directly. But it will give you a pretty good idea of what to expect.

Average Price Breakdown Per Service

Individual Services (all in CAD) Timeline (Weeks) Average Prices
Copy editing per word 2 to 4 From $0.03
Proofreading per word 2 From $0.02
Stylistic editing per word varies From $0.04
Substantive (structural) editing per word varies From $0.06
Indexing services per word 3 From $0.02
Ghostwriting per hour varies From $50 to $75
Copywriting per hour varies From $25 to $75
New ebook cover design 1 From $250 to $500
New paperback/hardcover cover design 1 From $1,000 to $1,500
New paperback/hardcover interior design and layout 2 From $2,500 to $3,000
New paperback/hardcover cover design and interior layout combined 2.5 From $3,500 to $4,500

Related reading: Why Do All Authors Need Editors and Proofreaders?

Related reading: Why Do Authors Need Graphic Designers?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.


3 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Life Story

write your life story

write your life story

For a long time now, you’ve been thinking you may one day write your life story. But the chatter inside your mind has you second guessing this choice. Maybe you’re waiting for someone else to give you the go-ahead—the permission—to move forward with this project. You may fear failure. Or, you may fear that your book could one day become a massive success. And maybe that level of success will shine a light on all the dark corners of your life for everyone to see, or maybe it will separate you from cherished family and friends. These fears can be daunting, whether they’re right or wrong, true or false.

3 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Life Story

So many questions may be running through your head. What will people think of me? Will they understand or will they judge me? Will this hurt or embarrass the ones I love? Should I do it?

There are a lot of articles out there on how to write your life story. But, today, I want to talk about 3 reasons why you should write this important story. I want to help you past the fear that is holding you back so you can stop procrastinating and move forward with it. After all, you’ve been thinking about doing this for a long time now. Haven’t you?

1. It’s the story you know best.

The best way to learn how to write a book is to start with a story that is most familiar to you—your own life story. There is no character research to be done. You won’t even have to create fictitious scenes out of thin air. Everything is already there at your disposal, inside your memory. All you have to do is sit down and write it.

Where do you start? Well, I recommend starting with any pivotal moment that stands out in your mind, that you’ve thought about many times. Write it down. Then write down the next moment. And then the next one. You can rearrange the timeline later, as you’ve written out more scenes from your life. The important thing is to start.

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.”
~Louis L’Amour

Do this religiously every evening, one scene at a time. The next thing you know, you’ll have a full book written.

2. It can be therapeutic for you.

You may find, as I did, that writing out certain scenes from your life is a therapeutic way of purging negative emotions—especially when it comes to writing about traumatic experiences. As you explain the situation and your reactions to it, you may also gain new insight that helps you heal, forgive, and move forward anew.

When it comes to your life story, there are no hard and fast rules on how to structure it. Just write. Let whatever comes to mind flow out through your hands onto that computer keyboard without judgement. Write from your heart. Feel it all again as you write it. By doing so, others will feel it when they read it later on. It will be that much more impactful. Which brings me to…

3. You may just help someone.

Lisa Nichols is a bestselling author, transformational coach, and professional speaker. She’s also one of my top sources of inspiration whenever I need a boost. What I love most about Lisa is her willingness to share her life story with others—including all the times she’s fallen during her lifetime.

Lisa is unapologetic about her journey. She encourages others to stand on top of their stories rather than carrying them as heavy baggage. One of her favourite sayings is, “The truth is sexy!” And she’ll help you to realize that if her truth is okay to share openly, then so is yours. You have nothing to hide or fear or protect if you’re sharing your truth in a productive way with genuinely helpful intentions.

“There’s a calling on your life that you don’t get to shake, and its only yours. No one else has the same calling as you. … I need you to fall in front of me. Because I’m not watching you when you fall. I’m watching how you get back up again. … I need you more than you need you. When you cross my path, and I watch you keep working at it, and I watch you keep coming back, you put oxygen in my chest.” Lisa Nichols, Mindvalley keynote

That’s perhaps the greatest reason why you should write your life story. In doing so, you may just help someone else.

One Important Disclaimer

No publisher can answer all your questions for you—particularly any legal questions you may have about writing certain controversial scenes or “characters” into your personal story. It’s always best to consult a qualified trademark, copyright and entertainment attorney in your area with these types of questions. Only a lawyer can provide you with legitimate legal advice.

Related reading:
Do You Really Have What It Takes to Write a Book?
Don’t Call Procrastination Laziness. Call it Fear.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



What is a Full Bleed Image?

What is a full bleed image? In printing, the term “bleed” refers the portion of an image that must be trimmed off because it extends past the page’s borders. Here is an example of a full bleed image on a book cover. All four sides of it must be trimmed to fit the page.

This book cover contains a full bleed image on it.

This book cover contains a full bleed image on it.

When you create any page (whether it’s an interior page or a book cover) with a full bleed image, you must leave room for trimming. Most printers will recommend allowing for a 1/4″ (quarter inch) bleed on all sides of the image when designing it. That way, nothing important will be trimmed off by mistake.

Floating Images With (or Without) Borders

Sometimes, you don’t want a full bleed image on the page. Instead, you may prefer that image to “float” in the white space around it. Here is an example of a floating image.

This book cover contains a floating image on it.

This book cover contains a floating image on it.

In this case, there is no need to account for trimming on any part of the image. So long as it is a print-ready file (300 DPI or better), it can be sized to fit the page however you want it to.

Preparing Graphic Files for Your Book

A graphic is defined as any picture, illustration, chart, image, logo, or graph you would like placed either in your book interior or on your book cover.

Colour Graphics

All colour graphics must be submitted to PPG in either .jpg (.jpeg) or .tif (.tiff) format, with a minimum resolution of 300 DPI, using the CMYK colour model.

Black and White Graphics

All black and white graphics must be submitted to PPG in either .jpg (.jpeg) or .tif (.tiff) format with a minimum resolution of 300 DPI. For best results, these images should be sent as grayscale/monochrome files. (CMYK colour images will not reproduce as well in black and white as grayscale/monochrome images will.)

What is a Full Bleed Image?

Truly, there is no right or wrong when it comes to using full bleed or floating images for your book. Much of this is subjective and all about personal preference. But keep in mind that printing a book filled with full bleed images will tend to be more expensive. These images use more ink, and there is also more time and labour involved regarding trimming the pages precisely.

Related reading: Preparing Your Digital Files for a Book Publisher

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Book Distribution Options for Independent Authors

book distribution optionsbook distribution options

book distribution options

Wondering how to distribute your book to your reader base? That all depends on how and where you publish it. In this post, we’ll look at the book distribution options available to independent authors.

Ebook-only Distribution Options

You may not need to produce a paperback version of your book if you plan to distribute it online only. When you publish an .epub through Kobo, or a .mobi through Amazon, your book will only be available through these companies’ online distribution networks.

In Canada, Kobo is partnered with Chapters Indigo. So, when you publish an .epub through Kobo Writing Life, it will show up on both Kobo and Chapters Indigo websites. Books that are published to Amazon through Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), on the other hand, will only be available for sale through Amazon’s ecommerce site.

Digital Book Distribution Options

The term “digital book” can refer to ebooks, paperbacks, and even hardcovers. Online worldwide book distributors, such as Amazon and Ingram Content Group, utilize print-on-demand (POD) technology to sell physical books online. In other words, they won’t print and store any physical copies of your paperback/hardcover book in a large warehouse anywhere.

Instead, they’ll store only the digital cover and interior files that you’ve uploaded to their sites. And they will print, bind, and ship only as many copies as someone buys from them at any given time. Of course, this saves you from having to print any upfront copies whatsoever. If someone goes to their site to buy ten copies of your book, then ten copies will be printed, bound, and shipped to that buyer. If another person buys only one, then they will print, bind, and ship only one—hence the term “print on demand.” This is a definite pro, isn’t it?

Now here are the cons: digital printers can only handle certain trim sizes and paper weights. This limits you to certain book trim sizes, binding types, and paper stocks/colours.

Traditional Distribution Options

If you want your books sold on traditional booksellers’ bookshelves, you must play by the peculiar rules set by the traditional book supply chain. And, believe me, peculiar is the best word to describe these old rules.

As well, most “bricks and mortar” booksellers and libraries will only purchase their books through established distributors such as Ingram Content Group. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis.

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Related reading: Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

Related reading: Why Do Authors Need Graphic Designers?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



3 Reasons Why Reading Helps Writing

Why Reading Helps Writing

Why Reading Helps Writing

If you’ve ever wondered what sorts of writing courses you should take to become a better writer, this post is for you. Here are three reasons why reading helps writing in the most useful ways.

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #1: You’ll Pick Up New Skills

In a recent guest post, one of PPG’s top guest bloggers, Michael LaRocca, talked about why he is a voracious reader. Here’s what he had to say:

I read voraciously, a habit I recommend to any author who doesn’t already have it. You’ll subconsciously pick up on what does and doesn’t work. Characterization, dialogue, pacing, plot, story, setting, description, etc. But more importantly, someone who doesn’t enjoy reading will never write something that someone else will enjoy reading. (LaRocca, 2019)

Even Stephen King agreed with this when he said, “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”

So, maybe you want to pay money for some writing courses. Fair enough. But, perhaps, your first step toward becoming a better writer is simply to pick up some books in your chosen genre and start reading. Start learning that way first.

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #2: You’ll Be Inspired to Write

Whenever I get writer’s block (which we all get sometimes), I read something to cure myself quickly. In fact, writers who spend even as little as half an hour per day reading another person’s work often find that they are more creative during their own writing sessions.

It doesn’t even have to be another book or anything related to your topic matter at all; it can be an online article, magazine, newspaper, or blog. Sometimes, the least likely source can inspire the greatest creativity. The most important point here is to keep yourself open and aware of the infinite pool of ideas all around you. Whatever it takes to get that first sentence out, do it. From there, thoughtful inspiration can—and will—take care of the rest. It always does.

I think this quote by Steven Wright sums it up well: “It usually helps me write by reading — somehow the reading gear in your head turns the writing gear.” So true!

Why Reading Helps Writing Reason #3: You’ll Have a Healthier Brain

Here’s an article you may find interesting: This is your brain on Jane Austen, and Stanford researchers are taking notes.

Researchers observe the brain patterns of literary PhD candidates while they’re reading a Jane Austen novel. The fMRI images suggest that literary reading provides “a truly valuable exercise of people’s brains.”

I think we’ve always known this. But now there is scientific proof.

Creativity is similar to muscularity in that it will begin to atrophy with a lack of regular stimulation. Just as even the finest athletes have those days when they must dig a bit deeper to find the will to carry on, all writers will have the same experience. Reading will help you keep your brain healthy which, in turn, will help your writing.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Welcome to My Blog: 10th Anniversary Celebration

Did you know 2019 marks the 10th Anniversary Celebration of the PPG Publisher’s Blog? It’s hard to believe so many years have passed since I wrote my inaugural Welcome to My Blog! post on November 22, 2009. Each month, I’d like to celebrate and recognize the milestones PPG has reached throughout the years, starting with building my website and creating this blog.

10th Anniversary Celebration PPG Publisher's Blog

10th Anniversary Celebration PPG Publisher’s Blog

Today’s website and blog look very different from what I started with 10 years ago. Back then, the theme colours were slate blue and grey as you can see in this video I produced for one of PPG’s first authors, Cheryl Bernard: Welcome to Polished Publishing Group (PPG). I’d also created the PPG Writers’ Forum and an online store to sell PPG books through. But neither of them took off, so I had to let them go a few years ago. C’est la vie!

Welcome to My Blog: 10th Anniversary Celebration

Through the years, I also tried to generate more interest in this blog—this book publishing company as a whole—by creating contests. You Could Win $100,000 in 2012! and You Could Win a Free Publishing Package in 2013! are two early examples. These well-intentioned ideas were intended to generate more social media likes and blog subscribers for PPG. But neither of them made any kind of grand splash in the publishing world. C’est la vie!

What I’ve learned over these past 10 years is that there is no substitute for dedicated work. There is no secret formula to “hack your way to success” quickly and effortlessly. Do you want to be a writer? Then you have to write. Daily. Do you want to be an author? Then you have to push past your fears of sharing the things you’ve written with others. And publish it once and for all. You need to have patience through all the seasons in order to grow The Author’s Money Tree strong and healthy. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned for sure these last 10 years: it’s possible!

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Selling Books Online Has Never Been Easier

Selling books online has never been easier—even for those of you storing boxes of paperbacks/hardcovers in your garages. You can move those books out once and for all. Order fulfillment and shipping is also easier now thanks to Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

Selling books online is made easier with Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

Selling books online is made easier with Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA).

On this blog, I often discuss ways you can sell more books through strategic blogging and digital publishing. But where does that leave those of you who have already printed a few hundred books that are collecting dust in boxes in your garage?

Selling Books Online is Not Limited to Digital Books

I had coffee with an aspiring author just last week. We were discussing the most effective ways for him to sell his non-fiction idea when he mentioned his father is a poet. Years ago, his father had self-published a poetry collection the old-fashioned way—by printing a few hundred copies of it at a local print shop. He’d held one or two bookstore signings after that and sold 40 or 50 copies to local supporters.

But he was surprised to learn that “bricks and mortar” booksellers and libraries will only purchase books through established distributors. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis. So, like many others, he found himself stuck with several boxes of books, unable to sell them. Nobody had told him it would be this difficult using the traditional book distribution system.

Today’s Book Distribution System Makes Life Easier for Indies

Today, all you need is a website address to direct traffic to and people everywhere can find you. An Amazon ecommerce webpage like this one is perfect. Here, you can write an enticing book description and upload a cover image to promote your title. Then you can simply drive traffic to that webpage from all over your province/country—never mind your local community. And you can rely on Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA) to house and ship those books for you.

But, like anything else, it’s not a simple “set it and forget it” type of system. You can’t just list the book and walk away. You still have to actively drive traffic to that webpage, and strategic blogging is the easiest and most cost-effective way to do it.

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Related reading: [Guest Blogging and Content Syndication] T-Shaped Marketing for Authors

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How to Price a Paperback Book

There are two main things you must consider regarding how to price a paperback book: who is printing the book; who is buying the book. These are your hard costs.

How to Price a Paperback Book

How to Price a Paperback Book

Who is Printing Your Paperback Book?

Any books that are printed using print-on-demand (POD) technology will cost more per unit than books that are printed in large quantities on traditional offset presses. As a result, you’ll have a smaller profit margin on POD books.

Still, it’s important to take advantage of POD in this day and age. It allows your customers to buy your books one at a time on ecommerce sites like Amazon. It also allows independent authors to print small quantities of your books at reasonable prices, as selling opportunities arise. For example, one paperback book may cost around $6 per unit to print on demand digitally.

Traditional offset presses are designed to print larger quantities of books at a lower cost per unit. In fact, they can’t print small quantities economically. It may only cost around $2 per unit to produce 1,000 copies of that same book on an offset press. The downside to printing this many copies is that it requires a large upfront investment. You will also have the added cost/hassle of warehousing all your books.

How to Price a Paperback Book: Printing Options

There’s a time and a place to use each type of printer, which is why PPG returns all working files and finished files to our authors. This allows you to choose if/where you’re going to print your book based on who you’re selling it to:

  • Traditional offset printing: best price for 1000+ copies
  • Standard digital printing: best price for 100 to 999 copies
  • Print-on-demand (POD) digital printing: best price for one to 99 copies

It’s always wise to contact a few printers to obtain quotes for 50, 250, 500, and 1000 books. Make your decision from there.

Who is Buying Your Paperback Book?

On that note, authors who wish to sell copies of your books through local retailers, such as book stores, will also have to factor each retailer’s profit share into your final retail price. Retailers/wholesalers buy publishers’ books at steep discounts in order to turn their own profits. They also expect your title to be marked as “returnable” (for a full refund) in case it doesn’t sell. Here are the industry standards for such discounts:

  • Book Wholesalers (i.e. Ingram, Baker & Taylor, libraries): 50-55% discount
  • Book Retailers (i.e. Chapters, McNally Robinson): 40-45% discount

Once your book has been designed and the final trim size, page count, picture count, and interior (black and white/colour) has been determined, a printer will be able to provide you with the cost per unit to print your book. It is best to factor in the highest possible printing cost (POD) along with the highest possible discount (wholesaler) when determining your book’s retail price. For example, if your POD cost per copy is $4.50, then your retail price should be set at $11.99 minimum as shown here:

How to Price a Paperback Book

How to Price a Paperback Book

Again, these costs are only a small part of the equation when determining the price of a paperback book and should only be used to calculate the lowest possible retail price. You should also do a thorough examination of your audience and what they value most.

Related reading: How to Price an Ebook: A Guide for Independent Authors

Related reading: Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.