Monthly Archives: October 2018

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

The best way to prevent other people from stealing your book is to protect your copyright ownership. You protect it by proving you’re the true copyright owner right from the very first written draft. There are a few simple ways you can do this.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book Before it is Published?

Every time you sit down to write a portion of your book, email that evening’s work to yourself. Send it to two or three private, secure email addresses. Save it on a USB drive, too. This not only backs up everything you’ve written so you always have access to it, even in the event of a computer crash. It also acts as date-stamped proof of your copyright ownership all along the way.

Here’s another great way to get this evidence of copyright ownership—a way that is virtually free of charge. It’s as simple as sealing a copy of your completed work in an envelope and mailing it back to yourself via registered mail. When the date-stamped package is returned to you, keep it sealed and stored in a fireproof container. Then, in the highly unlikely event that someone else ever tries to claim copyright ownership of your work after the fact, you will have more date-stamped proof of your ownership to fall back on.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book During the Publication Process?

The likelihood of any professional editor, designer, or proofreader stealing your manuscript is very low. But, for those of you who are concerned about this, I recommend hiring reputable help you know you can trust.

A great site to find freelancers of all kinds, with all experience levels, from all over the world, is UpWork.com. You can browse through the talent already listed there. Get a sense of what their hourly or flat fee rates are. Or you can post your own job, timeline, and payment expectations to see who replies and take it from there. I’ve personally used this site as a freelancer. I can tell you there are many checks and balances in place to ensure the freelancers you’re hiring are exactly who they say the are.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book After it is Published?

This is where things get a little more involved. When it comes to copyright infringement, the laws and remedies vary per each country. Click here to read some important advice from a trademark, copyright, and entertainment attorney free of charge.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors? That’s a loaded question. There are many things to consider regarding cost, inventory, distribution, and even colour reproduction.

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors?

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors?

Book Printing Lessons Learned the Hard Way

If I knew eight years ago what I know today, I would have given very different advice to a high-profile author regarding her book printing options. At the time, I figured she was a certain best seller in Canada. Not only was she a prominent Canadian athlete, but she was regularly hosted by our national media to speak about her sport.

With guaranteed publicity exposure like that, I was confident she could easily print and sell 2,000 copies of her book. I even assumed she would sell them out so fast that she’d have to print another 2,000 within a few months. We mutually (naively) agreed to this large offset book printing option so she would pay a lower cost per unit. We figured she would save money in the long run. And she would ultimately earn a higher profit per unit on all the books she sold.

In hindsight, we should have had a more in-depth conversation—the discussion I now have with all my authors. Never again will I ever make book printing recommendations based on one’s professional status, popularity, media exposure, or assumed readership. Why? Because this author still has a garage full of books that she never did sell … a fact that bothers me every day. I wish I had done things differently for her. Below is a list of the questions I wish we had clearly answered before printing any books.

How will people know where to buy the books you’ve printed?

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

During my book publishing career, I’ve worked with two sports icons and other prominent business professionals on their book projects. I’ve learned that, many times, the most successful people are also the most humble people. They don’t boast about their accomplishments. In fact, they don’t enjoy talking about themselves at all. This makes selling books a real challenge. Because the only way to sell your books is to talk about them. And you cannot just mention, “Hey, I’ve written a new book,” and leave it at that. You must come right out and say, “I’ve written a new book, and here’s where you can buy a copy.”

You must ask for the sale in order to make the sale. Over and over and over again. Until all the books you’ve printed are sold.

This author rarely ever mentioned her book during all the media interviews she gave, never mind informing people they could buy copies directly from her. She had the book listed on her website, but she seldom mentioned her website address to the media. Perhaps she thought her website had a strong enough SEO that it would easily attract relevant traffic to her book. And perhaps she also thought, once that traffic arrived, book sales would automatically result.

Rarely does it ever work that way. No matter who you are, you must ask for the sale in order to make the sale. Or hire someone to do that for you.

Here’s the irony in all this: her book is a best seller on Amazon several times over. People went there to buy the digital print-on-demand paperback version of her book, but very few visited her website to buy it direct. So, this bestselling author still has several hundred printed books collecting dust in her garage.

How are you going to distribute the books you’re storing at your home?

When we decided to print her books, we knew she could easily store them in her garage for free. Storage was no problem for her at all. But we never discussed the logistics of actually distributing those books to the buyers who would later purchase them from her website, and this is a critical detail to think through.

Sure, you can expect to pay a lower cost per unit when you print books in bulk. But what is your cost for packaging and delivering each book down the road? Are your buyers able to pick up their books in person? Or can you deliver en masse in person (e.g., selling direct at the back of a conference room at speaking events)? If not, you’ll have to pay for packaging, delivery costs, and possibly even customs fees for buyers who are located outside your country. All these costs can add up and take a huge chunk out of your profits.

On the other hand, if you’re passing those costs onto your buyers, it may prevent them from purchasing from you at all. It might be easier for them to just order your book from ecommerce sites like Amazon that can offer them a much lower shipping rate than you can.

Will local bookstores inventory and sell your printed books for you?

Book Distribution Truths

Book Distribution Truths

No. They won’t.

For the authors who believe you’ll be able to print and sell direct to popular “bricks and mortar” book retailers, I highly recommend you download and read this additional FREE ebookWhy Traditional Bookstores Won’t Carry Your Book on Their Shelves … and Why That’s Okay. The truth is, if you want your book placed in a local bookstore’s inventory, you must play by the peculiar rules set by the traditional book supply chain. And, believe me, peculiar is the best word to describe these old rules … as I’m sure you’ll agree once you read the book.

As well, most “bricks and mortar” booksellers (e.g., Chapters Indigo, Barnes & Noble, Waterstones, and Blackwell’s, et cetera) and libraries will only purchase their books through established distributors such as Ingram Content Group. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis.

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

The above questions are far from the only considerations you must make when deciding on your book printing options. In 3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors, I discuss many more.

There is much to think about, much to consider when it comes to book printing. For example, printers can be finicky machines at times. Have you ever wondered why, sometimes, a colour image looks different on your computer screen than it does in a printed document? This has much to do with the way the colour file was created by the designer as well as the type of paper it is being printed on and the type of printer being used. If colour precision is important to you, then you need a professional designer to help you design your book before you print it.

Before you engage in any type of book printing at all, be sure to read the above books and answer all these questions for yourself. It could save you a lot of time and money.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



2 Important Details About Traditional Publishing

2 Important Details About Traditional Publishing

2 Important Details About Traditional Publishing

Many people still hold the belief that, as purveyors of “the greatest literary works,” traditional publishers will do (and have always done) all the work for their authors. The same people believe traditional publishers carefully select only the “crème de la crème” of writers to work with—the sure sellers that will guarantee a profit—so those authors will never have to actively sell their own books. Many also believe they’ll earn more money publishing through a traditional publisher than they will if they self-publish. These are falsehoods, plain and simple. I’m unsure why these beliefs persist to this day. But here are 2 important details about traditional publishing that every author needs to know.

Important Detail #1: Copyright Ownership

DOWNLOAD THIS BOOK FOR FREE

DOWNLOAD THIS BOOK FOR FREE

As the original creator of your manuscript, you own 100 percent of all the rights to reproduce, publish, sell, and distribute your words in whatever manner you see fit. Your manuscript belongs to you and you alone—from the moment you write it. It’s only when you publish the work that some or all of your copyright ownership may shift to someone else. It depends on which publication method you choose. In other words, you can take a few different routes toward having your work published. Each of these publishing methods affects your copyright ownership a little differently.

Unfortunately, many authors unwittingly grant all their exclusive rights to a publisher without understanding the implications of doing so. As a result, these individuals usually retain only basic rights. They are recognized as the author of the work, and they are paid only a small percentage in royalties. The publisher keeps the rest of the profits because the publisher owns the copyright.

Download the above book free of charge for more details on how to protect your copyright and improve your own profit margin. It’s more important than you may realize.

Important Detail #2: Book Retailing

DOWNLOAD THIS BOOK FOR FREE

DOWNLOAD THIS BOOK FOR FREE

You may think that the major publishing houses with the larger budgets are able to spend more money on promoting and selling all their books. In fact, they watch their spending very closely:

As soon as a book shows signs that it’s going to take off, the sales, marketing and publicity operations mobilize behind it and look for ways to support it with extra advertising, trying to get more radio and TV appearances, extending the author’s tour or putting together a new tour to cities where the book is doing particularly well, and so on.

…the sales, marketing and publicity operations are geared and resourced in such a way that, when they see that a fire is starting to ignite, they are able to pour generous quantities of fuel on the flames. … But if further appeals fall on deaf ears and sales fail to pick up, then the marketing and publicity effort will be wound up pretty quickly – ‘In two to three weeks we might pull the plug,’ … So how long does a book have out there in the marketplace to show signs of life? How many weeks before it becomes a dead fish that will be left to float downstream? … I would say the life of a book today is about six weeks. And quite frankly it’s even shorter than that, but you probably have six weeks and that’s it. (Merchants of Culture, 2012)

So, your book has a mere six-week shelf life with the corporate trade publishers? Yikes! There must be a better way, right? I believe there is. Download the above book free of charge for more details on that better way. It’s also important to your success.

2 Important Details About Traditional Publishing

To succeed in this industry, it’s important to educate yourself about how the system works. The above two books can be downloaded free of charge from your choice of three different ecommerce sites. Download and read them for a better understanding on how this industry operates.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Do Authors Handle Their Own Marketing?

Do authors handle their own marketing?

Do authors handle their own marketing?

Do authors handle their own marketing? It depends. In the traditional publishing world, the publisher tends to make all the marketing decisions. In the self-publishing world, authors handle their own. With hybrid publishers, all decisions are shared, all along the way.

For a better understanding of these three publishing options, click here to read more details.

To be clear, authors must understand what exactly “marketing” entails. There are some things you’ll still have to do on your own, regardless of which publishing option you choose.

The Difference Between Advertising, Marketing, and Selling

To clarify, advertising is the vehicle you use to reach your target market of customers. Marketing is the language in which you choose to speak to them to pique their interest in your offering. And selling is the act of convincing them to buy from you—of coming right out and asking for the sale. The most successful salespeople harmonize all three of these components together.

ad·ver·tis·ing (ăd′v r-tī′zĭng)
n.
1. The activity of attracting public attention to a product or business,
as by paid announcements in the print, broadcast, or electronic media.
2. The business of designing and writing advertisements.

mar·ket·ing (mär′kĭ-tĭng)
n.
1. The act or process of buying and selling in a market.
2. The strategic functions involved in identifying and appealing to
particular groups of consumers, often including activities such as
advertising, branding, pricing, and sales.

sell (sĕl)
v. sold (sōld), sell·ing, sells
v.tr.
1. To exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent: We sold our old
car for a modest sum.
2. To offer or have available for sale: The store sells health foods.
4. To be purchased in (a certain quantity); achieve sales of: a book
that sold a million copies.

A traditional publisher will manage all the marketing and advertising for you: writing your back cover copy, designing your book cover, sending out review copies, placing ads in industry magazines.

Do Authors Handle Their Own Selling?

Yes. For the most part, selling will be up to you no matter who you publish through. Click here to read more details.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.