Monthly Archives: March 2018

How to Structure Your Book Outline

How do you write a book? One page at a time. Then again, some days it’s one paragraph at a time, isn’t it? I can relate!

But where do you even begin writing all those pages? That’s the real question. The task can seem daunting at the beginning.

Well, here’s a guideline you may find helpful. It’s a matter of starting out with a simple outline in point form and building it from there. I’ll use a non-fiction “how to publish a book” template as an example outline only because there are usually more points in a non-fiction Table of Contents than there will be in a fictional novel.

First and foremost, I divide my book into sections:

Section One: The Types of Book Publishers

Section Two: Understanding Copyright

Section Three: Book Sales and Marketing

Section Four: The Publishing Process

Section Five: Today’s Book Printing and Non-Printing Options




Now that I know there will be five sections to my book, I want to fill those in further within my outline. What will I be talking about within each section? It’s now time to write the titles of each chapter in between the above outline points:

Section One: The Types of Book Publishers

– Ten Questions to Ask Yourself Before Publishing Your Book

– Traditional (Trade) Publishing

– Vanity Publishing (Book Production and Formatting for Self-Published “Indie” Authors)

– Supported Self-Publishing (A.K.A. Assisted Self-Publishing, Hybrid Publishing)

Section Two: Understanding Copyright

– An Elementary Introduction to International Copyright

– Copyright Simplified: Understanding Publishing Contracts

Section Three: Book Sales and Marketing

– Traditional Sales Techniques

– Contemporary Online Sales Techniques

Section Four: The Publishing Process

– How to Write a Book

– How to Submit Your Manuscript to a Publisher

– ISBNs and Barcodes

– Publishing Agreements

– Professional Editing

– Professional Graphic Design

– Fact Checking and Indexing

– Professional Proofreading

– Book Reviews

– Distribution

Section Five: Today’s Book Printing and Non-Printing Options

– Ebooks

– Print-on-Demand (POD)

– Digital Printing

– Offset Printing

There you have it. You have your book’s rough outline now. It’s as simple as that. Some sections and chapters will be heavier than others, and that’s okay. You may also want to fill in more points for each individual chapter as you go along. That’s fine, too.




Once you’ve done that, you can now set up your writing schedule and deadlines for completion of the book based on this outline. Guesstimate how much time you think each individual list point will take you to write. One hour, two hours? There’s no right or wrong answer. It’s up to you. You’re simply trying to figure out roughly how long it’s going to take to finish this book so you can plan for it.

I recommend setting a goal for yourself to write at least one hour per day, six hours per week, every single week to completion of every point on your outline. This is a totally achievable goal that will help you stay on track because it gives you a flexible but consistent writing schedule to follow each week. Everyone can set aside one hour per day—even the busiest of people—if they really want to. And this schedule even gives you one day off every week!

As you write, the points on your outline may change a wee bit. You may think of additional chapters to add in, and that’s fine. My only caution to you is DON’T EDIT YOURSELF EVERY SINGLE TIME YOU SIT DOWN TO WRITE. You can waste hours upon hours by fixating on one sentence or paragraph, trying to edit it over and over again, rather than just moving on and writing the next one. Don’t do it. That’s when you’ll get stuck in a loop, unable to move forward. The idea here is to write something new every day so that you can move forward and finish the book—not edit it to perfection. There’s no such thing as perfection.

“If I waited for perfection I would never write a word.”
~Margaret Atwood

Let another editor polish your book for you once you’ve finished writing it. Take your own editor’s hat off. Put it away. In fact, shove it into the far back corner of your closet, close that door, and LOCK IT! The only hat you need to be wearing is that of the writer. Are you ready to complete your own outline now?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

[Online Marketing Tips] Complimentary Book with this Low-Cost Webinar

You know, it doesn’t matter where you are in the whole book process—whether you’ve just begun to write your book, are in the middle of having it published, or have already published it and are now looking for ways to sell it—you can benefit from the knowledge contained within this book: Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors
 
It can show you some really effective ways to grow your readership online in only six hours per week. That’s it, that’s all. It’s never been easier than this.
 
Do you have two short hours to spare today or tomorrow? If yes, sign up for this webinar in the time slot of your choice:
 
Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors – Morning Sessions
 
Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors – Afternoon Sessions
 
Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors – Evening Sessions
 
You don’t have to be an introvert to benefit from this knowledge. Extroverts are welcome, too!




Join any one of these webinars and I’ll mail a paperback copy of the book to the address of your choice. I hope to meet you via webinar soon!

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

[Fast and Easy Blog Posts] Winning Tactics for Online Marketing

Unless you’re a full-time online marketer, you probably don’t have several hours every day to dedicate to promoting your book(s). That’s why you need some winning online marketing tactics that shouldn’t take you much time to complete. The truth is, it only takes one hour per day, six days per week, to start seeing some real traction with your book sales and marketing efforts. Consult this list for some additional great ideas to get yourself started.

Recycle an Old Blog Post or Online Article on Social Media

Looking for the time to write a new blog post or online article but just can’t find it? Why not share one of your old ones on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook? One thing is for sure: most people won’t recall it from before; and, even if they do, they’ll most likely be enticed to read it again. Don’t view recycling old blog posts as the lazy man’s form of content marketing since it has some significant benefits. 

  • Here are some of my old ezine articles that I continue to share via social media to this day. 
  • And, of course, I often re-share content from this blog with others if I’m stuck for time on a particular day.

Write Captivating Blog Headlines

Your headline can either make or break your content. There are fantastic tools on the Internet, and in my various books, that can help you come up with interesting headline ideas instead of recycling the overused ones. And remember! Make sure your headlines contain your top keyword for optimum SEO success!




Make Sure Your Top Keyword Repeats Within Your Post

Make sure your top keyword (in this case “blog”) also repeats at least twice for every 100 words of content that you write. This is a great way to ping a search engine’s algorithm to index your blog post that day. Some people, such as Penny Sansevieri,  also recommend writing 500 words minimum (whether you’re writing a book description or a blog post):

While it may seem like you want something short and sweet (so many people don’t like long book descriptions, right?) this is where the algorithm either kicks in, or doesn’t, based on the word count.

You must have at least 500 words in your book description. Why? Because too little content won’t register well (if at all) with Amazon and Google won’t pick it up, either…
Another note about your primary keyword: it should appear 2 to 5 times for every 100 words in your book description. So, no keyword stuffing, certainly, but using the keywords in a way that will help ping Amazon’s algorithm and also get you some attention in Google, as well.

I highly recommend reading the rest of her post titled “Keys to Understanding Amazon’s Algorithms.” It’s informative.




Write a One-Minute Blog Post

For the days when you need to post something on your blog but don’t have time to write 500 words, how about a one-minute blog post? Yes, it is very much possible to write a one-minute blog post. Obviously, the post will not be content rich but it can be one of the easiest ways to engage your subscribers, followers, and fans on a particular day … once in a while only. How about browsing current events related to your industry, writing a short opinion-post about it, and asking for feedback from your readers in return? It’s much like opening up a forum conversation. There’s your one-minute blog post.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Change Your Thinking on What Constitutes a Useful Non-Fiction Book … and Watch Your Business Soar!

How long does a book have to be in order to be considered a legitimate book by readers? 30,000 words? 60,000 words? 90,000 words? Even more? How many chapters long should it be? Five, 10, 15, or more? Which old wives’ tale have you heard that has you filling your manuscript with a bunch of extra (not necessarily useful) information just to meet someone else’s theoretical and unsubstantiated recipe for success?

Leave the Fluff Out. Period.

Throw away any pre-conceived notions you may have about what constitutes a useful book—particularly when it comes to word count. I’m here to tell you that it’s more important to focus on the quality of your content than the quantity of words you’ve written. There is absolutely no need to add a bunch of unnecessary fluff into a non-fiction book just to get it to a certain word count. Basing a book’s value and saleability on word count is old-fashioned thinking. With non-fiction books of any kind, your number one priority is to understand your readers’ question/problem, and then answer/resolve it for them as clearly and easily as possible. That’s it, that’s all.

Cutting Edge Online Selling Techniques to Grow Your Business

There is a form of online book sales and marketing known as “rapid release” publishing that many of today’s most successful independent authors are using to sell literally thousands of books every year. Some of these indie authors are earning six-figure incomes from their ebook sales alone. In my research, I’ve found that non-fiction authors are among the perfect candidates for this form of self-publishing. Why? Because of your diverse demographics (e.g., seniors, adults, teenagers, children, males, females, et cetera) and the varied subject matter you can cover within your respective industries. Here are just a few examples:

Caterers can recommend different types of foods (e.g., canapés, fruit appetizers, vegetable appetizers, hors d’oeuvres, kebabs, deep fried appetizers, et cetera) for all types of events (e.g., weddings, bar mitzvahs, corporate functions, children’s parties, theatre events, et cetera).

Health and fitness entrepreneurs can write endless non-fiction copy about different muscle groups, exercises, food groups, diets, et cetera.

Interior decorators can make recommendations about floor plans, lighting, artwork, framing, Regency, Georgian, et cetera.

Hairdressing professionals can cover long hair, short styles, curls, braids, updos, colours, et cetera.

Online and distance educators can repurpose weeks and weeks of lesson plans for the do-it-yourselfers of the world who prefer the more solitary learning environment of an ebook or audiobook lesson to a social classroom setting.

Automotive service technicians can advise readers on vehicle maintenance and repair for all kinds of different makes and models, various automotive parts and how they work, et cetera.

The list goes on and on. The possibilities are endless for business owners who wish to publish non-fiction books to expand their businesses.

How to Write for the “Rapid Release” Publishing Process

Does a book have to be 60,000 words and 10 chapters long in order to constitute a useful book? Or could each chapter be a mini ebook in its own right—part of a “mini series” of individual topics that allow readers to choose which topic they wish to read and buy that one alone on any given day? 

Let’s say you want to complete one mini ebook within a three-week time period. If you’re already running a business full-time, that means you probably only have two or three hours of writing time available per day during the weekdays; but if you’re truly dedicated to this “rapid release” publishing process, then you’ll take at least another six hours per day on the weekends, if not more. That gives you a conservative 81 writing hours in total.

3 hours X 5 days X 3 weeks = 45 weekday hours
6 hours X 2 days X 3 weeks = 36 weekend hours
45 + 36 = 81 writing hours

Commit yourself to this schedule. You’ll be amazed by what you can accomplish once you make a firm decision to write for this many hours each week.

Now break it down by hour. How many words can you write in one hour? 100 words per hour will result in an 8,100-word mini ebook at the end of three weeks. 300 words per hour will result in a 24,300-word ebook. 500 words per hour will result in a 40,500-word ebook at the end of three weeks. Don’t get too hung up on the word count because, as I said earlier, quality is more important to your readers than quantity is. I added this mathematical exercise here simply to demonstrate what you can accomplish in a short amount of time. When you break it down like this for yourself, it suddenly appears more achievable, doesn’t it? And when your goal appears more achievable to you, you’ll be more apt to stick with it and see it through to the end.

How About a Picture Book?

Children aren’t the only ones who can enjoy a picture book. Picture books containing “how-to” illustrations or graphics throughout (e.g., exercise routines, hair styling techniques, before and after automotive repair examples, et cetera) can be very helpful to adult learners. Let’s say your goal is to create a 20-page picture book, within three weeks, that contains only one or two sentences per page. Well, including the cover, that will be 21 pages to complete—equivalent to one page per day over a three-week period. Totally doable, especially when it’s your passion!

It’s time to change your thinking on what constitutes a useful non-fiction book, because the way the world reads is changing, and the way books are written and published is changing along with it.

Want to learn more about “rapid release” publishing and how it works? Click here.




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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

People Judge a Book by Its Cover … AND Its Interior

After writing (ghostwriting) and copy editing comes the next step in the book publishing process: professional graphic design. This is a critical part of the process, and it is as important to an ebook as it is to a paperback or hardcover. 

Not All Designs are Equal

No matter how engaging your story might be, people are going to “judge your book by its cover” before they ever decide to read it. Yet, it won’t stop there. They’ll not only judge it by the cover design; they’ll also judge it by the interior design. Just as not all editors are equal, a noticeable difference is apparent between a book designed by a human or mechanical “template builder” and one designed by a professional graphic artist. As such, the graphic design of your book—both inside and out—should receive the same professional attention as the content itself.

When deciding how you would like your book’s cover and interior to appear, it is best to browse a bookstore (whether in person or online) and view the many different examples there first. What designs, colours, and fonts draw your attention the most? Write down the book titles and author names, so you can use this as a handy reference when it comes time to provide a description to your graphic designer. This will help the process run much more smoothly for both of you.




Put Some Thought Into It

It is very important to put a lot of thought into the design of your book rather than just leaving it to chance. Graphic designers can only take what is given to them and create the book from there. It’s downright dangerous to give someone a simple instruction such as “You choose the font for me” or “You choose the colour for me” because that’s exactly what the designer will do—choose it for you depending on his or her own personal preferences. What if that designer didn’t fully understand what you were after? What if you end up not liking it at all because of that? As a result, you might end up paying extra for a complete redo down the road. So, it’s best to do your homework ahead of time and provide as much detail to the designer as possible. 

Author Photos Say It All

Author photos make as powerful a statement about the author as a book cover makes about the story inside. As such, this photo should be given as much care and consideration as the rest of the book. When it comes to author photos, “attractive” can come in all kinds of forms. 

The back cover of a book is a great place to put an author photo, but sometimes it’s just as well to put it on the front. It can be a simple headshot or full-length portrait, depending on the writer’s preference. It can be done in black and white or color.

Visit the section of your local bookstore or favorite e-commerce site where your book will sell. Browse the covers and authors photos in there. Which one jumps out at you most? That’s your starting point. Run with it.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

How to Design a Paperback Book Then Convert it to Ebook Format

NOW AVAILABLE through Amazon’s Kindle, Kobo, and E-Sentral! Download it today!

Here are two common misconceptions held by many new indie authors: one, they assume most people only read ebooks nowadays; and two, they assume ebooks are the only books they can sell online using various forms of Internet marketing. Both of these statements are incorrect. The truth is, there are just as many people out there who still want to hold a paperback book in their hands as there are people who love the compact convenience of e-readers. So, if you only publish an ebook, you’re likely losing out on half your potential audience.

No budget to print a paperback book? That’s okay! With the invention of print-on-demand (POD) technology, today’s indie authors no longer have to print and store paperback books in order to sell paperback books. All you have to do is supply the digital files for your paperback’s cover and interior to the e-commerce site of your choice because most of these online retailers utilize POD technology to sell paperbacks rather than stocking those books in warehouses. Then, whenever they receive an order for a paperback, they simply print, bind, and ship the exact quantity ordered—whether it is one book or ten—all at the same time. Easy peasy!

Whenever possible, it’s always best to hire an experienced graphic designer to help you create both the interior and cover files of your paperback book. It is also wise to source professional ebook conversion services to convert your paperback’s digital files into ebook format for you. Doing so will bring you the most polished result, and it will also free up your time to do what you do best—write another book.




For the “do-it-yourselfers” out there who prefer spending time rather than money, there are ways to do your own graphic design and basic ebook conversions. That’s what this ebook is about. It will teach you how to create your paperback book using two common, user-friendly software programs that are part of the Microsoft Office suite of programs: Microsoft Word (for the interior) and Microsoft Publisher (for the cover). It will also teach you how to convert your paperback Word files into .EPUB and .MOBI ebook files using an online ebook conversion software called Calibre.

I used Microsoft’s 2016 Office programs on my PC computer to create my recent book titled How to Build a Loyal Readership So Your Self-Published Books Get Picked Up by Literary Agents and Trade Publishers, so that is what the instructions in this ebook are based on. If your PC computer has a different version of Microsoft Office, or you’re using a Mac computer, then you may have to reference Microsoft’s help and training page alongside the instructions provided here. That’s because the tools you’ll be using to create your own book may be found in different places depending on which version of the Microsoft Office programs you’re using. Same thing with Calibre; I used the 3.18 version, but there are often new updates to that ebook conversion software. If any of the instructions I give you here seem slightly different than what you see on your screen, then you have most likely downloaded a different version and should consult Calibre’s help section for updated instructions.

Where Do I Even Begin Writing My Book?

As you sit down to write your book, you may be thinking, “Where do I even begin?” Well, there’s no right or wrong way to begin. For me, every one of my books was a little bit different. They all came to me in their own unique ways.

Sometimes, I’ll receive just a simple concept in my mind. I write it down, set it aside, and then I wait until the next thought comes along to further strengthen that vision. As each new thought arrives, I do the same until there’s enough substance to begin piecing together the first concrete outline of the whole book into point form. Basically, when this is the way a book comes to me, I know I must be patient with it. Let it grow at its own rate. It will come together eventually. It always does.

Other times, I’ll receive the end of a book first. The final chapter will already be a crystal-clear vision in and of itself, so then all I have to do is go back to the beginning and write to that end. Fill in the blanks.

My first fictional novel, A Letter to My Son, took me around ten years to complete. In hindsight, the majority of that time was spent procrastinating rather than writing due to fear of the unknown. I didn’t see that clear path ahead of me. I didn’t know how to get published and wasn’t all that sure it would ever happen, so I felt no strong sense of urgency to finish the book. Then, one year, I experienced a life-changing event that had me questioning myself and my life purpose. It was the catalyst that motivated me to finish my book once and for all—to find a way to publish it—to keep that promise to myself. Once I found that resolve, all the information and resources I needed to publish the book found me. And I did it! (Smiling.) What a proud moment!




Each book that followed came a little easier simply because I knew the process ahead of me. Isn’t that the way life is? The first time you try anything is always the hardest. But, if you push through that initial fear and prove to yourself that it’s possible, it does get easier. Needless to say, my second book, A Letter to My Daughter, took me only two months to write. My third book, 11:11, took me around six months. I’ve also since released three more non-fiction guides to help writers and authors navigate the business aspects of book publishing, sales, and marketing. I’ve produced an ebook series to help online marketers earn passive income from ebooks: Book Publishing Shortcuts for Online Marketers. And I’ve produce another ebook series titled T-Shaped Marketing for Authors that teaches all kinds of online marketing techniques authors can use to boost their ranking on eCommerce sites like Amazon and Kobo.

When I was younger, writing was more a pastime than a career aspiration, so I only wrote when the mood hit me. After my first book was published, and I became a little more serious about things, I found a structure that seems to work very well for me to this day. Lately, with the help of this structure, I’ve been publishing a new book once every four to six weeks. It’s possible!

I hope learning this little bit of information about my personal journey as a writer will inspire you to finish writing (and eventually publish!) your own book. You can also find many more sources of inspiration and education on this blog to help you achieve your goals, whatever they may be. Good luck!

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

CRUCIAL: Fact Checking and Indexing Business Books

Non-fiction readers expect to find an index in the back of your book. They also expect your information to be completely accurate. You can hire fact checkers and indexers through PPG to help you accomplish this. 

So, what exactly is an index, and why would anyone look for one at the back of your book if that book already has a table of contents at the beginning? Tia Leschke (2010) explained it perfectly with this comment, “A good index is a roadmap to information. It leads readers to all the information on a particular subject, and it also leads readers to related information that might interest them.”

Where a non-fiction book’s table of contents can direct readers to whole sections of a book where they might find a particular topic of interest, an alphabetized index takes it a step further by allowing readers to pinpoint the exact pages within the book where specific names or terms can be located. For example, an author might want to refer back to a specific detail in a book that discusses “print-on-demand (POD)” technology, but he or she may not recall exactly which page that detail is on. The quickest way to find it is by referring to the index at the back of the book where all the possible pages are indicated together in one place beside that term. 

Indexes can be as helpful in ebooks as they are in paperbacks and hardcovers. PPG automatically produces an Adobe PDF/DRM ebook along with the POD paperback or hardcover version of each author’s book; therefore, the ebooks are formatted consistently with the index intact. We also employ a professional ebook conversion company whose staff knows how to adjust that index within the new file format to ensure it remains intact.




The indexing portion of PPG’s book publishing process is completed immediately after the self-publishing author has approved the final interior design of the book in .PDF format. From there, the approved .PDF is sent to the indexer to complete the index in MS Word format based on this final word placement, and that MS Word.doc is then returned to the designer to pop into the back matter of the book. From here, the first hard copy (physical proof) of the book is printed and sent to one of PPG’s professional proofreaders for yet another once over with yet another fresh set of eyes. Attention to detail is critical in the book publishing process, and we make sure every section of every book receives equal attention to detail by our qualified team.

Make no mistake, many non-fiction readers will scan through the index at the back of a book before making a buying decision on that book. If they’re unable to find the specific information they’re looking for, they won’t make the purchase. That’s how important an index is, so be sure you include one in your non-fiction book.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

What is Search Engine Optimization (SEO)?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of search engine optimization (SEO). The term refers to the various techniques people can use to improve (optimize) their respective webpages’ standings on search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Baidu.

As an author, the “webpages” you’re trying to promote online may be your online articles, blog posts, the e-commerce site where you sell your book(s), or even the home page of your website. It’s crucial to your success to improve each one’s SEO.

How Does it Work?

Think, for a minute, about when you use a search engine to find something. Where is the first place you look when the search results come up? The top and centre of the page? In addition, how many links are you willing to click through to find what you’re looking for? Maybe five or six at the most? Maybe your eye will scan down that first page for something interesting; or, if you have the time, maybe you’ll dig a little deeper and look through the second or third page to see what comes up there. This is what SEO is all about. Statistically, most people will stay on the first page, and that is why it’s crucial to make sure you and your book appear on that first page for as many of the major keywords that are associated with your topic matter as possible. Regular and consistent online writing (blogging) is one way to help you achieve this level of SEO.




Find Keywords

The first thing you will want to do is find specific keywords related to your book’s topic. How do you do this? It’s easy! Pull up the search engine of your choice in your browser, such as Google. Think about what combinations of words your readers will be typing into that search engine when they’re looking for your book. Type them in to test them out and see what comes up. Find as many variations as you can. The more, the better because it will give you more topic matter to create even more content over time.

Create Content

Writing blog posts and online articles that are informative and helpful will bring you more readers—but only if they contain the keywords we just talked about. Repeating a specific keyword at least twice per every 100 words will improve the SEO of that content for that keyword. Then you must share those pieces with others via email marketing, social media marketing, et cetera. Why share it? Because the SEO of that article will further increase and improve with every unique click from every new person who views it.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Effective Copywriting and Top of Mind Awareness (TOMA)

This content first appeared on Warrior Forum and has been republished here with permission from the author.

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Writing really effective, eye-catching copy to promote a product or service is important. When it comes to online marketing, that copy also needs to cleverly incorporate the item’s highest ranking keywords for the purpose of search engine optimization (SEO).

But there’s more to it than that, and this is where things like blogging, social media marketing, and pay-per-click (PPC) advertising come in handy. If you want to reach all your current and prospective customers, then you must achieve top of mind awareness (TOMA) with all of them by constantly staying in front of them.

Some people think of their target market as a fixed segment of the public that share similar characteristics (e.g. my customers are adult males and females between the ages of 25 to 45 who enjoy … blah blah blah, you fill in the blank). But your customers aren’t static like that. Think of them more as a fluid stream of people who are flowing in and out of your market all the time. If you want to stay top of mind with them then you need to stay in front of them all the time so that, when they’re in the market to buy whatever it is you’re selling, they’ll recall you ahead of your competitors. This will increase your chances of a sale.




Here’s an analogy for you. Think of a shopping mall. Think of all the types of stores in that shopping mall: shoe stores, clothing stores, furniture stores, et cetera. Most everyone has a need to buy shoes, clothing, and furniture at one time or another, right? But you may not be in the market for it right this minute today. You may not need it until next month or next year. And who are you most likely to buy from when the time comes and you’re in the market to buy? You’ll buy from the most trusted brand in your mind–a trust that was built up over time with regular and consistent copywriting that was shared over and over again through blogging, social media, PPC, and whatever other means.

Why don’t you fill in the blank and name “whatever other means” people can use to achieve top of mind awareness with their clients. What are some other great vehicles we can use to stay front and center with our target markets? Leave a comment below.

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