Writer’s Block: What Causes It and How to Overcome It

Writer’s block definition from Dictionary.coma usually temporary condition in which a writer finds it impossible to proceed with the writing of a novel, play, or other work. What causes this temporary condition? And how do you overcome it more quickly so you can get on with the business of writing?

Writer's Block

Writer’s Block

I believe there are three root causes to writer’s block: fear, perfectionism, and exhaustion. And I offer the following remedies to help you overcome each one more quickly.

Writer’s Block Cause #1: Fear

To overcome your fear, you must first acknowledge it: Don’t Call Procrastination Laziness. Call it Fear. What is the root cause behind your procrastination? It’s usually a fear of rejection or criticism in some form, as discussed in the above-linked blog post. Put your fears down on paper. Articulate them to yourself in writing. Read them out loud to yourself. When you do this, you’ll begin to see just how irrational many of your fears really are. That should help you get back to work.

Writer’s Block Cause #2: Perfectionism

Are you someone who finds yourself obsessing over every last little detail, editing the same line over and over again rather than writing a new one? This is another form of procrastination that can slow your writing progress down.

“If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word.”
~Margaret Atwood

The best way to overcome perfectionism is to stop overanalyzing everything. Stop nit-picking and editing yourself along the way. Not long ago, I wrote a blog post titled 7 Tips to Help You Write a Book FAST! These same tips can not only help you write more quickly; they can also help you overcome writer’s block in the first place.

Writer’s Block Cause #3: Exhaustion

Are you taking good physical care of yourself, eating healthy, and exercising regularly? Are you getting enough sleep? If not, you may find yourself both physically and mentally exhausted. You’ll most likely experience writer’s block ahead of other writers who are minding their mental and physical health in all these ways. Want some great tips on how to prevent exhaustion? Here they are: How to Stop Feeling Tired All the Time.

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Author Photos: How to Signal Your Tribe

Author Photo Kim StaflundAuthor Photo Kim Staflund

Author Photo Kim Staflund

Author photos make as powerful a statement about a writer as a book cover makes about the story inside. As such, your author photo should always be given as much care and consideration as the rest of your book.

I recently came across an article by Tucker Max that resonated with me. He comes across quite critical in this article (which is the norm for him), but he says one thing really well throughout the entire piece: your author photo is an important way of “signalling your tribe.” Better yet, he shows examples of what exactly this means.

Years ago, author photos only appeared in these three places: on the back cover of a book; inside the back matter of the book’s interior; or on a publisher’s press release. Nowadays, you can take full advantage of social networking sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to promote yourself and your books. You may also choose to write a personal blog or create a video of yourself on YouTube.

There are many ways for you to promote yourself online now. And there are just as many types of professional photographers and videographers to help you put your best face forward.

Author Photos on Book Covers

The front or back cover of a book is a great place to put an author photo. It can be a simple headshot or full-length portrait, depending on the writer’s preference. And this is a great place to get creative. A professional photographer knows how to use either colour or black and white to depict the mood of the book within the author photo. To make the picture even more attractive to readers, writers can dress themselves up as a character from inside their books or create the setting of the book within the background of the picture.

Author Photos on Social Networking Sites

Facebook not only helps you to keep in touch with personal friends and family members. It can also be used as a business networking tool much like LinkedIn. Both are great places to post an author photo as your profile picture for added exposure.

That said, you should be careful about the types of photographs you’re posting on these public sites. If the author photo on the back of your book is provocative or risqué in any way, it’s wise to leave that one to the back of the book and have a second, more conservative photo done specifically for these social networking sites. This is especially important if you only write part-time and currently work in a professional office setting. Today’s employers often “Google” prospective and current employees before deciding whether to hire or promote them.

Author Photos on Personal Blogs

You can also use your blog to promote yourself, your work, and your books. The primary reason why blogging is so important is search engine optimization (SEO), which means to improve (optimize) your ranking on search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing. When your prospective readers visit your blog, a great author photo can keep them interested in sticking around a little longer to click through and read more of your posts.

Author Video Readings on YouTube

YouTube is a great place to post an author video reading that will be available to a worldwide audience within a matter of minutes. You can even share a link to this video with all your readers via email, social networking sites, or your personal blog.

Never before has it been easier to reach such a broad audience so quickly—and at such an affordable cost! This makes it all the more important for you to put your best face forward with professional-quality author photos.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

Printers and publishers have a lot in common in terms of what their graphic designers will and won’t do. Today’s post will help you understand why.

Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won't Do for You

Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

First and foremost, I’m referring to hybrid publishers as opposed to traditional (trade) publishers here. When traditional publishers purchase the rights to publish your manuscript, they are also buying full creative control of the book. That means they will make all the graphic design decisions on your behalf. You won’t have much say in anything. But in the self-publishing and hybrid publishing business models, you retain full copyright ownership of the book. As such, you also retain your creative control and must make all the design decisions for yourself. (You can learn more about today’s three primary book publishing methods by clicking here.)

Printers and Publishers Won’t Make Graphic Design Decisions on Your Behalf

Printers and Publishers Need to Know This

Printers and Publishers Need to Know This

Twice in the last nine years, I took on projects from authors who said they had no idea how they wanted their book covers to look. I pressed them for details with various leading questions. But they both insisted they didn’t know what they wanted. They asked me to have my graphic designer supply them with two sample layouts to choose from without providing any real instructions ahead of time. I cringed. I knew where this was headed. But I obliged and asked my designer to create two sample layouts based on the little information we had: the type of book, topic matter, and stated demographic.

In both cases, the designers did their best and came up with what I considered to be beautiful, professional designs. But, not surprisingly, both authors hated the sample layouts. “That’s not what I had in mind,” they both complained. It had been a giant waste of everyone’s time.

You see, even if you think you don’t know what you want, you still do to some degree. And this is important information to provide the graphic designers of both printers and publishers ahead of time.

When deciding how you would like your book’s cover and interior to appear, it’s best to browse a bookstore (whether in person or online) and view the many different examples there first. What designs, colours, and fonts draw your attention? Write down the book titles and author names, so you can use this as a handy visual reference when it comes time to provide a description to the graphic designer. This will help the process run much more smoothly for both of you.

You can download this book completely free of charge to obtain a check-list of the types of information graphic designers will need from you upfront. I highly recommend you read it.

Printers and Publishers Won’t Choose Graphics for You Free of Charge

Book Printing Tips

Book Printing Tips

If you want to include any illustrations, graphics, or images on your book cover—or in your book’s interior, for that matter—you must ensure you have the legal right to use them. There are three ways you can do this: one, you can use photos, illustrations, or graphics that you have personally created and therefore own the copyright to; two, you can purchase them from someone else; or three, you can find public domain stock photos that are deemed as “free for commercial use” and download those. Either way, it’s best if you to provide these files to printers and publishers ahead of time. Otherwise, you’ll spend a lot more money paying them to create or find these files on your behalf.

Click here for more information regarding where and how to find public domain stock photos for yourself. Always respect another artist’s copyright. If you don’t—if you just pull any image file you find off the Internet and use that for your book without first confirming you have the right to use it—you may find yourself involved in an expensive copyright infringement lawsuit down the road.

Printers and Publishers Won’t Choose Paper Stock for You Without Some Input

I fully understand the inclination of authors to say, “Just use the standard interior and cover stock,” when asked what type of paper they want used for their paperback or hardcover books. I get it. You’re thinking that printers and publishers are the experts, so they should know what you need in this regard. Here’s the problem with that: there is no one standard.

As you’re browsing through the bookstore to determine your design preferences, take note of all the different types of books in front of you. Notice how some books are thicker than others. Some covers are glossy and shiny; others are dull. Some interior pages are thin while others are thick. The colours vary. The sizes vary. Everything varies! (Choice is a wonderful thing. But it can also be a bit of a nightmare at times.)

When you’re browsing the bookstore, take note of the types of cover and interior paper stock that appeal to you most . Take photos of your preferences. Better yet, bring physical samples to show printers and publishers when it comes time to place your order with them.

Printers and Publishers Will Sit Down With You to Discuss All These Details and Make Recommendations

Here’s one more thing printers and publishers have in common: they want to make you happy. When you’re happy, they’re happy!

Once you’ve visited the bookstore and gotten an idea of what you’re looking for, your next best course of action is to book a graphic design meeting to discuss your findings. Ask questions, listen to the recommendations, then make your decisions from there.

Printers and publishers are here to help you create the best book possible. But they need you to help them help you by doing some homework ahead of time. Trust me, it will save you time and money in the long run.

Related reading: Preparing Your Digital Files for a Book Publisher

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What is Author Central and Why Do You Need It?

What exactly is Author Central and why does every author—whether self-published or traditionally published—need it? Here’s the greatest reason why. 

Author Central (Amazon)

Author Central (Amazon)

Whether you self-publish a book directly to Amazon using Kindle Direct Publishing or use the services of either a traditional or hybrid publisher to publish it for you, there is a 99% chance your book will be available for sale on Amazon. Everyone sell books through this ecommerce giant now.

What is an Author Central Page?

An Author Central Page acts as your own personalized webpage on Amazon. It is a place where you can include an author biography to let others know more about you and your books. You can upload author photos and videos. And you can let Amazon know which books from the online store belong to you. Futhermore, you can include an RSS feed to drive more traffic to your blog. (The above image displays an example of how your blog’s RSS feed will appear on your page.)

Why Do You Need an Author Central Page?

Amazon hyperlinks each author’s name beside the title of his or her book(s). Whenever people click on those hyperlinks, they’re shown a list of all the books by that author. Unfortunately, they may also be shown books by other authors with the same or similar names. The only way to ensure all your books show up together in one Amazon search, without other unwanted authors in the mix, is to create an Author Central Page and add your books to it.

Need another another great reason to create your own Author Central page? Here are three: 3 Ways an Author Central Page Can Spike Your Ranking on Amazon.

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The Top 3 Traits of Successful Authors

The Top 3 Traits of Successful Authors

The Top 3 Traits of Successful Authors

The top 3 traits of successful authors are much like the attributes of top athletes and entrepreneurs. What you focus on makes all the difference.

Find the Best Idea of Success to Follow

There is so much advice out there for aspiring authors today. How do you know which recommendations to follow? Well, that depends. What is your idea of success? The first thing you need to do is figure that out. Then find a coach or mentor who is already achieving those results and follow his or her lead.

My own publishing career began 25 years ago. I started out with a traditional publisher, and much of the advice I’ve given authors along the way has been coloured by that experience. That is, until early 2017. I shifted my focus then because I wasn’t achieving my own idea of success by following traditional methods. So, I went in search of contemporary author success stories to inspire myself. And I found what I was looking for! At long last, I found a viable roadmap to my version of success.

Make a Plan that Suits Your Lifestyle

Once I learned what many other authors are doing with such success, I decided to implement their strategies into my own life. I sat down at my desk with my calendar and sketched out a writing schedule that fits well with my lifestyle. I’ve been doing it ever since, and I’ve made more gains these past two years than I did in the first 23 combined! I’ve watched the PPG Publisher’s Blog increase from a mere 1,000 registered users in early 2017 to over 7,500 at writing time today (and still growing). I’ve also seen downloads of my backlist books on Amazon, Kobo, and E-Sentral collectively increase from under 5 books per month to over 350 per month on average (and still growing) within the same time period.

Do the same thing for yourself. Learn the steps your ideal mentor is taking each day to achieve the results he or she is achieving. Then sit down with your calendar to figure out how you can customize those steps to suit your own schedule.

Take Consistent Action on Your Plan Every Day

It’s never enough to simply seek inspiration and write your goals down. It takes consistent action toward those goals to become a successful author. Today’s top authors work at it every single day as detailed in this recent blog post about Joanna Penn and Jeff Haden. These two people epitomize the top 3 traits of successful authors: find your idea, design your plan, and then take consistent action toward its achievement every day.

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Author Salary: How Much Does a Book Author Earn?

Author Salary: How Much Does a Book Author Earn?

Author Salary: How Much Does a Book Author Earn?

Book authors don’t actually earn an author salary, per se. Instead, they are paid royalties based on their number of books sold. Depending on the book publication method used to publish a book, authors can expect to earn different royalty rates. (You can learn more about today’s three primary book publishing methods by clicking here.)

Traditional Author Salary (Physical Books)

Traditionally, whenever a physical book (e.g., paperback, hardcover) is published, there is automatically a large run of 1,000 or more copies printed. The publisher and/or its distributor(s) store these copies away in large warehouses. And this large print run means a higher upfront cost for that publisher on each author’s book.

Traditional publishers tend to pay authors a 7-to-10% royalty rate based on the retail price of a book. They can’t pay much more due to all the expenses associated with publishing/printing/selling physical books: editing and design; publicity; printing and distribution; shipping costs; deep discounts given to retailers (45% of list price) and wholesalers (55% of list price). With all these costs eating away at their bottom lines, there’s not much leftover in the end. Traditional publishers also lose money from the high waste of book returns they receive from traditional retailers.

So, let’s put this into perspective. With the average retail price of a paperback book listed at $9.99, that means authors can expect to be paid $1 per book in royalties. In other words, a publisher would have to sell 5,000 copies of that book for its author to earn $5,000 … less income tax. Ask the average traditionally-published author how many copies of his or her book were sold. Likely, those authors will tell you they sold way less than 5,000 copies in total.

Contemporary Author Salary (Digital Books)

Obviously, ebooks and print-on-demand paperbacks/hardcovers have lower upfront costs to produce. Other than editing, design, and publicity, you can eliminate almost every other cost. Authors can expect to earn a way higher royalty rate on digital books as a result. In fact, today’s self-publishers are earning up to 70% royalties (e.g., between 45% and 70% royalties on Kobo books versus between 35% and 70% royalties on Amazon books).

The best way to sell books in today’s world is to utilize the power of search engine optimization (SEO). Effective digital publishing requires a little more finesse than simply combining traditional offline sales and marketing methods with modern online techniques. Doing so can actually be counterproductive. This is because traditional publishing takes time while digital publishing requires momentum.

If you want to succeed at publishing and selling books nowadays, you can no longer “waste precious time” by publishing only one book per year or one blog entry per month. The Internet rewards speed and productivity, and the Internet is your greatest ally. Used right, it can help you stand out among the millions of books being published worldwide each year. It can help you earn a six-figure income. Believe it or not, many of today’s online self-publishers are earning that much. If you’re willing to do the work, the world is your oyster in today’s digital world.

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What Does a Publisher Do for a Writer?

Perhaps, even more than “What does a publisher do for a writer?” the true question here is “What do authors want? And will they get that from a publisher?”

What Does a Publisher Do for a Writer?

What Does a Publisher Do for a Writer?

What Do Authors Want?

I came across an article aptly titled What Do Authors Want? the other day. It discussed that what every author truly wants is “discoverability” and that traditional publishers don’t actually offer this:

The two editors did not specify what they thought ‘discoverability’ was. They did, however, say that what publishing firms could offer was not ‘discoverability’ but ‘the professional environment’. This included professional editing to a high standard, high-end book layout and design, a ‘reasonable’ distribution (again, not specified), and publicity in accordance with the allocated budget. This budget, they said, varied, but on average it was between £200 and £300 per book. They also emphasised that authors were now expected to contribute to their own marketing and publicity, especially through social media and blogging.

It seems to me that the discrepancy between what authors want and what the publishing firm might provide must have consequences.

The article goes on to compare three different author experiences: the first traditionally published by a major corporate firm; the second traditionally published by a small independent press; the third self-published with support from an online hybrid publisher. (You can read the differences between these publishing methods by clicking here.) In terms of which of the three authors sold the most books, not surprisingly it was the third self-published author.

What Does a Publisher Do for a Writer?

I’ve mentioned the realities of traditional publishing many times in the past, most recently in this blog post: 2 Important Details About Traditional Publishing. The truth is, it doesn’t matter what publishing method you use. If you want your books to be “discovered” by the masses, it takes time and consistent focus—on your part. You can build your own readership the way many of today’s most successful independent “indie” authors do. As a result, a traditional publisher may just sign you down the road.

The true value of a traditional publisher is the professional support they can provide in terms of editing and graphic design. As well, they can get you into the “bricks and mortar” bookstores more easily than you can on your own. But the rest is up to you alone. It’s always been that way for the majority of authors.

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Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

Why would you want to get book reviews for each of your books? In today’s publishing world, it’s less about impressing readers and more about search engine optimization (SEO).

Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

In a search engine’s eyes, if your books have more legitimate reviews than other authors’ books within the same genre, your social media sites have more followers, and each of your webpages (e.g., each individual post on your blog, each individual book on Amazon or Kobo, et cetera) have more click-throughs, then you must have more expertise and authority than other authors have. As a result, you’ll rank higher than they do. It’s all based on algorithms.

But expertise and authority are not enough. In fact, trust is an increasingly strong ranking factor for search engines like Google. Positive book reviews can help to build that sense of trust around your author brand.

Positive, legitimate book reviews such as these can also be used to increase the number of relevant backlinks to a particular webpage. This is worthy of a higher ranking in Google’s eyes, too.

What is a backlink? In a nutshell, backlinks are incoming links to a webpage. Relevant backlinks can increase the SEO of a webpage while also bringing it more quality traffic. What constitutes quality traffic? It is relevant visitors to your website—people who are looking for exactly the type of books and information that you offer. That’s what you really want.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book?

The best way to prevent other people from stealing your book is to protect your copyright ownership. You protect it by proving you’re the true copyright owner right from the very first written draft. There are a few simple ways you can do this.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book Before it is Published?

Every time you sit down to write a portion of your book, email that evening’s work to yourself. Send it to two or three private, secure email addresses. Save it on a USB drive, too. This not only backs up everything you’ve written so you always have access to it, even in the event of a computer crash. It also acts as date-stamped proof of your copyright ownership all along the way.

Here’s another great way to get this evidence of copyright ownership—a way that is virtually free of charge. It’s as simple as sealing a copy of your completed work in an envelope and mailing it back to yourself via registered mail. When the date-stamped package is returned to you, keep it sealed and stored in a fireproof container. Then, in the highly unlikely event that someone else ever tries to claim copyright ownership of your work after the fact, you will have more date-stamped proof of your ownership to fall back on.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book During the Publication Process?

The likelihood of any professional editor, designer, or proofreader stealing your manuscript is very low. But, for those of you who are concerned about this, I recommend hiring reputable help you know you can trust.

A great site to find freelancers of all kinds, with all experience levels, from all over the world, is UpWork.com. You can browse through the talent already listed there. Get a sense of what their hourly or flat fee rates are. Or you can post your own job, timeline, and payment expectations to see who replies and take it from there. I’ve personally used this site as a freelancer. I can tell you there are many checks and balances in place to ensure the freelancers you’re hiring are exactly who they say the are.

How Do I Prevent Other People From Stealing My Book After it is Published?

This is where things get a little more involved. When it comes to copyright infringement, the laws and remedies vary per each country. Click here to read some important advice from a trademark, copyright, and entertainment attorney free of charge.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Is Book Printing a Good Idea for Indie Authors?

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors? That’s a loaded question. There are many things to consider regarding cost, inventory, distribution, and even colour reproduction.

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors?

Is book printing a good idea for indie authors?

Book Printing Lessons Learned the Hard Way

If I knew eight years ago what I know today, I would have given very different advice to a high-profile author regarding her book printing options. At the time, I figured she was a certain best seller in Canada. Not only was she a prominent Canadian athlete, but she was regularly hosted by our national media to speak about her sport.

With guaranteed publicity exposure like that, I was confident she could easily print and sell 2,000 copies of her book. I even assumed she would sell them out so fast that she’d have to print another 2,000 within a few months. We mutually (naively) agreed to this large offset book printing option so she would pay a lower cost per unit. We figured she would save money in the long run. And she would ultimately earn a higher profit per unit on all the books she sold.

In hindsight, we should have had a more in-depth conversation—the discussion I now have with all my authors. Never again will I ever make book printing recommendations based on one’s professional status, popularity, media exposure, or assumed readership. Why? Because this author still has a garage full of books that she never did sell … a fact that bothers me every day. I wish I had done things differently for her. Below is a list of the questions I wish we had clearly answered before printing any books.

How will people know where to buy the books you’ve printed?

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

During my book publishing career, I’ve worked with two sports icons and other prominent business professionals on their book projects. I’ve learned that, many times, the most successful people are also the most humble people. They don’t boast about their accomplishments. In fact, they don’t enjoy talking about themselves at all. This makes selling books a real challenge. Because the only way to sell your books is to talk about them. And you cannot just mention, “Hey, I’ve written a new book,” and leave it at that. You must come right out and say, “I’ve written a new book, and here’s where you can buy a copy.”

You must ask for the sale in order to make the sale. Over and over and over again. Until all the books you’ve printed are sold.

This author rarely ever mentioned her book during all the media interviews she gave, never mind informing people they could buy copies directly from her. She had the book listed on her website, but she seldom mentioned her website address to the media. Perhaps she thought her website had a strong enough SEO that it would easily attract relevant traffic to her book. And perhaps she also thought, once that traffic arrived, book sales would automatically result.

Rarely does it ever work that way. No matter who you are, you must ask for the sale in order to make the sale. Or hire someone to do that for you.

Here’s the irony in all this: her book is a best seller on Amazon several times over. People went there to buy the digital print-on-demand paperback version of her book, but very few visited her website to buy it direct. So, this bestselling author still has several hundred printed books collecting dust in her garage.

How are you going to distribute the books you’re storing at your home?

When we decided to print her books, we knew she could easily store them in her garage for free. Storage was no problem for her at all. But we never discussed the logistics of actually distributing those books to the buyers who would later purchase them from her website, and this is a critical detail to think through.

Sure, you can expect to pay a lower cost per unit when you print books in bulk. But what is your cost for packaging and delivering each book down the road? Are your buyers able to pick up their books in person? Or can you deliver en masse in person (e.g., selling direct at the back of a conference room at speaking events)? If not, you’ll have to pay for packaging, delivery costs, and possibly even customs fees for buyers who are located outside your country. All these costs can add up and take a huge chunk out of your profits.

On the other hand, if you’re passing those costs onto your buyers, it may prevent them from purchasing from you at all. It might be easier for them to just order your book from ecommerce sites like Amazon that can offer them a much lower shipping rate than you can.

Will local bookstores inventory and sell your printed books for you?

Book Distribution Truths

Book Distribution Truths

No. They won’t.

For the authors who believe you’ll be able to print and sell direct to popular “bricks and mortar” book retailers, I highly recommend you download and read this additional FREE ebookWhy Traditional Bookstores Won’t Carry Your Book on Their Shelves … and Why That’s Okay. The truth is, if you want your book placed in a local bookstore’s inventory, you must play by the peculiar rules set by the traditional book supply chain. And, believe me, peculiar is the best word to describe these old rules … as I’m sure you’ll agree once you read the book.

As well, most “bricks and mortar” booksellers (e.g., Chapters Indigo, Barnes & Noble, Waterstones, and Blackwell’s, et cetera) and libraries will only purchase their books through established distributors such as Ingram Content Group. They simply won’t deal with individual authors on anything more than a per-event consignment basis.

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

The above questions are far from the only considerations you must make when deciding on your book printing options. In 3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors, I discuss many more.

There is much to think about, much to consider when it comes to book printing. For example, printers can be finicky machines at times. Have you ever wondered why, sometimes, a colour image looks different on your computer screen than it does in a printed document? This has much to do with the way the colour file was created by the designer as well as the type of paper it is being printed on and the type of printer being used. If colour precision is important to you, then you need a professional designer to help you design your book before you print it.

Before you engage in any type of book printing at all, be sure to read the above books and answer all these questions for yourself. It could save you a lot of time and money.

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