Tag Archives: ghostwriter

Collaboration: Mental and Emotional Preparation for the Ghostwriting Process

What is a Ghostwriter?

According to The Free Dictionary by Farlex, a ghostwriter is:

n.
a person who writes a speech, book, article, etc., for another person who is named as or presumed to be the author.
[1895–1900, Amer.]

Ghostwriters are often hired by business professionals who wish to produce books and various other marketing materials to promote their leaders, products, or professional services. A published book can lend credibility to one’s offering if it is done properly. If you want to produce a book that presents you as an industry expert in your field, it should be completed by an industry expert in the book publishing and content writing fields. 

Mental and Emotional Preparation for the Ghostwriting Process

Some authors go into the ghostwriting process with the misconception that, once they’ve handed their notes to the professional, their job is done and the book will be written. Yes, a ghostwriter can save a lot of time in terms of the writing portion itself. But it is important to understand that ghostwriting is an ongoing, collaborative process in which the author will be required to answer questions and proof chapters all along the way.




Authors can also expect to go through a series of emotions during the ghostwriting process. It is natural to feel an initial resistance to each new draft—to feel a bit frustrated if things aren’t worded exactly the way the author first envisioned. This is a natural reaction during the ghostwriting process, particularly when it comes to personal books like biographies. Recognizing this, authors should read a draft over once, and then put it away for a couple of days to give their emotions time to settle. If they do this, it will be easier to read it over again, the next time around, with a more objective mindset. In that objective state, they can then feel free to change the words they don’t like or correct the dates, times, and names however they see fit. All authors make better decisions in the objective state than they do in that initial emotional state.

Analogy for Ghostwriting

A big part of a police officer’s job is to write reports—to try to interpret the recollections of various witnesses and to create the most accurate appraisal of a situation as possible. The biggest challenge in writing this report is that although each witness saw the same thing, they’ll all tend to give the police officer a different account mainly because each of them was viewing it from a different vantage point. An officer can only take what he or she is given and translate it as factually as possible.

Ghostwriters have a similar challenge when it comes to interpreting the notes they receive from authors and trying to turn those words into a veritable yet readable, marketable story. Sometimes, the ghostwriter might interpret some things a bit differently than the author initially intended. That’s okay. It can all be fixed along the way, which is why we say that this is an ongoing, collaborative process—just as the entire hybrid publishing process is. It is a partnership from start to finish. If authors can keep this analogy and these tips in mind throughout the ghostwriting process, they will be more patient with it, which will make it run much more smoothly for them and their writing partner. In the end, they’ll come out of it with an amazing book of which they can both be very proud.

Also read: Working With a Ghostwriter to Write a Book

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