Monthly Archives: February 2011

How to Publish and $ell a Professional Quality Book

If you’ve ever seriously thought about publishing a book, then this half-day information session is perfect for you! Contact us to buy your tickets today. You’ll be glad you did.
 
PUBLISH Your Book This Year!
 
P
– Primary Types of Book Publishing (A Comparison)
U – Understanding The Modern Submission Process
B – Book Publishing’s Most Critical Elements (For Professional Results)
L – Legal Deposit at Library and Archives Canada
I – It’s Time to Print Your Book
S – Sales & Marketing (Traditional)
H – Hashtags: Today’s Online Marketing
 
Click here to register for upcoming PPG events near you or to learn how you can earn money by hosting your own event.
 
Click here to download a copy of this .PDF flyer for more information:
 

   
   
 
PPG is a Canadian book publisher dedicated to serving Canadian authors. Visit our book publishing website to learn how you can publish your book today. 

Working With a Proofreader to Finalize a Book

What Self-Publishers Can Expect During the Proofreading Process
  
A proofreader’s job is to review the final designed copy of a bookafter the writing, editing, and layout (graphic design) stages have been completedto ensure it is ready for print.
  
* * *
 
Where a copy editor’s job is to review and improve an author’s raw manuscript, and the graphic designer’s job is to arrange that raw edited text into a professional and appealing layout, a professional proofreader provides yet another set of eyes to ensure all the components fit together properly.
 
Proofreading is a Crucial Ingredient of the Professional Book Publishing Process
  
Each book is a bit different, and there may be additional components added in before the proofreader finally sees it. For example, non-fiction readers expect to see an index at the back of a book; so an experienced indexer should be hired to add that section in after the design stage of the process has been completed. The professional proofreader is introduced at the very end. This individual reviews the professionally laid-out version of the book.
 
A Professional Proofreader Will Complete the Following Nine-Point Check
 
Interior:
 
• the front matter (such as the table of contents) is accurate and correct
• the back matter (such as the index) is accurate and correct
• headers and footers are accurate and correct
• bad breaks are eliminated
• text is kerned to flow smoothly throughout
• margins and trim size all measure properly
• spelling and punctuation is correct
 
Cover:
 
• spacing, bleeds, and trim size all measure properly
• spelling and punctuation is correct
 
As shown in the above list, a professional proofreader is someone who is knowledgeable and experienced with both basic language editing (spelling and punctuation) as well as the technical aspects of book design (kerning, bleeds, trim size, et cetera). If the proofreader finds any issues in the layout, he or she will indicate these and send them back to the designer to make the corrections. Once the corrections are complete, this draft is sent back to the self-publishing author for final proof approval before the book goes to print.
 
The Final Word
 
As self-publishers are paying all their own production costs in order to retain 100% copyright ownership of their books, they ultimately have the final word on everything from editing to design to production … as they should! That said, with this level of creative control comes a higher level of responsibility. It is the self-publishers’ duty to review and approve their books at every stage along the way.
 
They, alone, are accountable for the final product; so it is important for self-publishers to go over everything themselves—in addition to the contributions of the copy editors, indexers, designers, proofreaders, et cetera—before approving anything. This will ensure they produce a professional final product they can feel very proud to display to the public.  
  
This article was originally published at Suite101 in February 2010 
 
 
 
PPG is a Canadian book publisher dedicated to serving Canadian authors. Visit our book publishing website to learn how you can publish your book today. 

Working With a Copy Editor to Polish a Book

What Self-Publishers Can Expect During the Copy Editing Process
  
The introduction of supported self-publishing has given authors more creative control over their books. They ultimately have the final say. But some fundamentals remain.
  
* * *
 
The reality is, self-publishers’ books are competing in the marketplace with trade publishers’ books. Trade (traditional) publishers always have their books professionally edited. Always. This is why they can boast such high quality. In light of this, a qualified supportive self-publishing house like PPG will require all its authors to go through a professional copy edit in the very least. Here is what self-publishing authors can expect along the way:
 
The Modern Copy Editing Process
 
Book publishing is done electronically in this day and age, so it is important for authors to have access to a computer, the Internet, and email. They should also have a working knowledge of Microsoft Word and use it to write the first draft of their manuscripts. Manuscripts should contain only basic formatting when they are submitted to the supportive self-publishing house for publication:
 
• Times New Roman font, 11 pt. size
• Left-aligned text
• Entire document double-spaced
• Only hard returns in this document should be at the end of chapter titles and paragraphs
• Insert a page break at the end of each section and/or chapter
• Insert an additional page break where you want blank pages to appear
• Type “Insert image file name here” wherever you wish to see your electronic photo files inserted.
• Italicize any words/phrases you wish to see italicized in the formatted version of your book
• Bold any words/phrases you wish to see bolded in the formatted version of your book
• Underline any words/phrases you wish to see underlined in the formatted version of your book
 
This clean format makes each paragraph easier for a copy editor to read and correct. The edited manuscript is then returned to the author, via email, in a similar format; however, it will contain highlighted editor’s notes that can be read and accepted or declined, one at a time, using Microsoft Word’s edit mode (a.k.a. “tracking mode” or “review mode”).
 
The Same Old Emotions
 
All authors can expect to go through a series of emotions during the copy editing process, both while they are waiting to receive the edited manuscript back and when they view it for the first time. It is the same whether those authors are working with a supportive self-publishing house or a traditional trade publisher. It is natural to feel some initial resistance to an editor’s recommendations, and it’s common to feel a bit emotional. After all, this isn’t a mere book—it is an author’s blood, sweat, tears, heart, and soul.
 
Recognizing this, authors should read the edited manuscript over once, and then put it away for a couple of days to give their emotions time to settle. If they do this, it will be easier to read it over again a second time with a more objective mindset. In that objective state, they can then feel free to go through each change, one by one, and either accept or decline it using Microsoft Word’s edit mode. All authors make better decisions in the objective state than they do in that initial emotional state about which changes are valid and really should be retained.
 
The Final Word
 
As self-publishers are paying all their own production costs in order to retain 100% copyright ownership of their books, they ultimately have the final word on everything from editing to design to production … as they should! That said, with this level of creative control comes a higher level of responsibility. It is the self-publishers’ duty to review and approve their books at every stage along the way.
 
They, alone, are accountable for the final product; so it is important for self-publishers to go over everything themselves—in addition to the contributions of the copy editors, indexers, graphic designers, proofreaders, et cetera—before approving anything. This will ensure they produce a professional final product that can stand proudly beside its competitors.  
 
This article was originally published at Suite101 in February 2010 
 
 
 
PPG is a Canadian book publisher dedicated to serving Canadian authors. Visit our book publishing website to learn how you can publish your book today. 

Working With a Ghostwriter to Write a Book

What Authors Can Expect During the Ghostwriting Process
  
When hiring a ghostwriter to help pen a book, it is important for authors to remember this is an ongoing, collaborative process. There are a few ways authors can prepare.
  
* * *
 
Some authors are qualified writers and choose to write their own stories. Others choose to hire professional ghostwriters to help them create that compelling narrative. Both are acceptable ways to produce a book. That said, before electing to go with the latter of these two options, there are a few things authors should have prepared ahead of time.
 
Preparation of Clear Deadline Expectations
 
Before contacting a ghostwriter with a new book project, it is important for authors to set a clear goal as to when they would like to see their new book in print. Even more crucial: that deadline should be shared with the ghostwriter at the very start of the partnership. This will ensure both parties are headed in the same direction at the same time.
 
Is this a family history book that must be published and printed before that family reunion in July? Is this a business history book that must be completed in time for a company’s milestone anniversary? Is this a special cookbook or novel or poetry collection that the author wants available in time for Christmas gift giving? These are three common examples of deadlines that must be shared with the ghostwriter ahead of time.
 
From there, the ghostwriter can backtrack, with the help of the book publisher, to determine how much time is available for the writing, editing, design, proofreading, indexing, and printing stages of the book publishing process in order to meet that deadline.
 
Preparation of Notes
 
Book publishing is done electronically in this day and age, so it is important for authors to have access to a computer, the Internet, and email. They should also have a working knowledge of Microsoft Word (for the text portion of their book) and Adobe Acrobat Reader (for viewing .PDF proofs of their designed books down the road).
 
If a ghostwriter is supplied with various sets of notes that are scrawled on several different sheets of paper, the author’s costs will immediately skyrocket because it will take the ghostwriter extra time to type everything into Microsoft Word from scratch.
 
If at all possible, it is best (and most cost-effective) for authors to supply all their notes to the ghostwriter in one, continuous Microsoft Word document. The top of this document should include a first draft outline of roughly where they want this book to go and in what order they want each section to appear. From there, the ghostwriter will ask more questions to gain a clearer picture of the author’s vision, and the book will begin to take form.
 
Mental/Emotional Preparation
 
Some authors go into the ghostwriting process with the misconception that once they’ve handed their notes to the professional, their job is done and the book will be written. It is important to understand that ghostwriting is an ongoing, collaborative process in which the author will be required to answer questions and proof chapters all along the way.
 
Authors can also expect to go through a series of emotions during the ghostwriting process. It is natural to feel an initial resistance to each new draft—to feel a bit frustrated if things aren’t worded exactly the way the author first envisioned.
 
This is a common reaction during the ghostwriting process, particularly when it comes to personal books like biographies. Recognizing this, authors should read a draft over once, and then put it away for a couple of days to give their emotions time to settle. If they do this, it will be easier to read it over again, the next time around, with a more objective mindset. In that objective state, they can then feel free to change the words they don’t like or correct the dates/times/names however they see fit. All authors make better decisions in the objective state than they do in that initial emotional state.
 
Analogy for Ghostwriting
 
The perfect analogy for the ghostwriting situation is a police officer interviewing several witnesses to a car accident. Even though every witness saw the same thing, they all gave the police officer a different account … not because they were purposely trying to change the story or be malicious in any way, but simply because they were each viewing it from a different vantage point. They were still being honest and true in their account. The same can be said for a ghostwriter that has to take someone else’s words and interpret them and write them into a readable, marketable story.
 
If authors can keep this analogy and these tips in mind throughout the ghostwriting process, then it will run much more smoothly for them and their writing partner. In the end, they will come out of it with an amazing book they can both be very proud of. 
 
This article was originally published at Suite101 in February 2010 
 
 
 
PPG is a Canadian book publisher dedicated to serving Canadian authors. Visit our book publishing website to learn how you can publish your book today.