Monthly Archives: November 2009

Book Signings

Not only is it possible to move a surprising amount of books at a signing, but it is also a great way for a new author to get used to being “on display” in public. There isn’t the same pressure to perform and entertain as there is at a reading. It is a much more comfortable arena to learn how to talk about (sell) your book to readers.

Although each bookstore does things a little differently, the process for setting up a book signing is fairly standard. It’s a matter of contacting the store’s event coordinator to arrange a mutually available date (Saturday’s are often best for retail traffic) and providing consignment copies of your book to them ahead of time. Sometimes, there is a basic fee involved to cover co-op advertising. In this instance, both the author and the bookstore each agree to pay 50% for any ads that are placed to promote the event. Other than that, the only investment is your books (which, presumably, you already purchased beforehand) and your time (signings generally last for two to three hours during an afternoon).

The bookstore will set up a display table for you ahead of time. From there, it is up to you to engage customers in conversation and convince them to buy your book. You sign it for them and then direct them to the bookstore’s checkout to pay for it. When the event is over, the bookstore will send you payment for your portion of the profits (which is typically 60% of the retail price). They may choose to keep additional consignment copies of your book on hand if they feel there is a good chance they can sell them, or they may return any leftover copies to you.

To improve the success of your signing, it’s a good idea to do your own self-promotion rather than relying solely on bookstore traffic. One way to generate buzz is to post event notices in community newspapers and on as many nearby bulletin boards as possible. Of course, there is no substitute for inviting your friends and family members to these events. (I can always count on my mother to buy up half the stock in one fell swoop!)

Who else can add to this entry about book signings? Any advice for new authors to help them make their own events more successful?

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

 

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

 

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

 

Community Craft Fairs

One relatively inexpensive way for a new author to sell books is by reserving a table at a community craft fair. Your only investment is: your books (which, presumably, you already purchased beforehand); your time (craft fairs generally run from around ten o’clock in the morning to three o’clock in the afternoon on a Saturday); your table registration fee (which is usually somewhere between $35 to $50 depending on the venue and location); your presentation (anything from a simple table cloth to display stands to posters); and your cash float (so you have change available for paying customers). That’s all there is to it.

The number of books you can sell at a craft sale is largely dependent on traffic flow. How well did the organizer promote the event on behalf of the vendors? How well did you promote your own attendance at the event? (It’s not only up to the organizer to bring people to the sale!) It can be “hit or miss” at these fairs, but don’t let that discourage you. If you were able to hand out a few flyers or business cards to people who wouldn’t otherwise know you, that’s still valuable exposure for a new artist. And if you sold more than enough books to pay for your table, consider the event a success.

How much of an entrepreneur are you? Rather than paying to attend someone else’s craft fair, have you ever considered organizing one of your own? It’s a lot more work, but it’s a way to earn extra profit in addition to your book sales. First, you find an available venue and decide how many tables it will accommodate. Next, you figure out the total cost of that venue plus any other advertising you will use to promote the sale (such as display ads in community newspapers, street signs for the day of the event, and Facebook event invites … to name a few). Finally, you divide up your cost per table (which should include an additional fee to cover your own time and effort as the organizer) and start selling the event to other vendors. In my experience, most people will jump on the opportunity to promote their products and services at such a reasonable rate. Once you get one or two people interested, the word spreads fast and the tables are all full before you know it.

Can anyone else add to this entry about community craft fairs? Do you have any advice new authors can use to help them make their own events more successful?

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

 

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

 

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

 

Protecting Your Copyright

What is copyright? Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary (www.merriam-webster.com) describes copyright as: Noun The exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute the matter and form of something (as a literary, musical, or artistic work) How do I obtain copyright ownership of my work?In Canada, you own the copyright to your work as soon as you create it. There is no legal requirement to register it. How do I protect my copyright? This is, perhaps, the real question writers are asking when they refer to the copyright of their books, and the answer is: by proving you are the true copyright owner of the work. Protecting your copyright can be done in a very straightforward and cost-effective way. It’s as simple as sealing a copy of your completed work in an envelope and mailing it to yourself via registered mail. When the date-stamped package is returned to you, keep it sealed and stored in a fireproof container. In the unlikely event that someone else ever tries to claim copyright ownership of your work after the fact, you will have the date-stamped proof of your ownership to fall back on.

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

The Value of Two Sets of Eyes

I once heard a greenhorn author say, “I don’t need anyone else to edit my manuscript. It is self-edited. I’ve looked over it a thousand times.” It made me cringe. The truth is, every manuscript can benefit from two or more sets of eyes. Even the best writers use professional editors to improve the quality of their books.

Why do some people resist having their work edited/proofread by a professional? I would venture to guess there are two primary, underlying reasons: one, the fear that their work may be stolen if they share it with a stranger prior to publication; and two, the fear that the context of their work may be changed during the editing process. Let’s discuss these two concerns separately….

 

 

 

  1. Fear of Copyright Infringement:

    First and foremost, the chances of anyone having their manuscript stolen and published by someone else is next to nil; however, writers can give themselves peace of mind by protecting their copyright ahead of time.

    In Canada, writers own the copyright to their work as soon as they create it. There is no legal requirement to register it. That said, copyright can be protected in a very straightforward and cost-effective way. Writers can simply seal a copy of their completed work in an envelope and mail it to themselves via registered mail. When the date-stamped package is returned to them, they should keep it sealed and stored in a fireproof container. In the unlikely event that someone else ever tries to claim copyright ownership of their work after the fact, they will have the date-stamped proof of ownership to fall back on.

  2. Fear of Changed Context (Loss of Personal Voice):

    It is important to understand that a copy editor’s job is simply to enhance a writer’s story as it is—to offer helpful suggestions that may have been overlooked or not considered at all.

    Simple copy improvements


A second set of eyes will catch those unobvious errors—such as transposed words and letters, punctuation issues, or improper word usage—that an author is simply blind to after reading the same thing over and over again (and that electronic spell checks sometimes miss).

Story development improvements

Have you ever been trained for a new position by someone who knew the job so well they unconsciously went about many of the details and neglected to discuss them with you? They’d been doing it for so long, themselves, that they were unaware of everything they were doing. As a result, you received only part of the information which made it difficult to follow the entire process from start to finish.

In much the same way, writers can sometimes see a scene so vividly in their own minds that, when they transfer it to paper, they unwittingly leave out important details the reader will need. A good editor will point this out and ask the question, “How exactly did we get from ‘A’ to ‘B’ here?” This type of commentary gives writers an opportunity to go back and fill in the blanks they didn’t realize existed beforehand.

At PPG, authors always have the last say on the editing and design of their books. A good copy editor will work with a writer to enhance the story while keeping the original voice intact, and a smart writer will take that editor’s advice.

As always, let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. (And if you see any typos in this blog, please bring them to my attention. After all, two sets of eyes are always better than one!)

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Who Owns the Artwork?

What is Graphic Design?In addition to my book publishing background, I’ve also worked in the world of print advertising sales for many years. What these two industries have in common is that each business (whether it be a newspaper, magazine, phone directory, or publisher) creates artwork for its respective clients as part of its overall service offering.

A company’s artwork policy can vary: some believe that once you’ve paid for and published a creative, the copyright belongs to you, and you can reproduce it at your discretion as part of your own marketing campaign; others believe that any artwork they have created for you belongs to them and can only be reused with their permission at an additional charge. Having been on both sides of this coinas the service provider and the paying clientit is my opinion that the copyright for a creative belongs to the paying client, and all the high-resolution artwork should be returned to that client upon receipt of payment. I won’t delve into any examples related to print advertising here, but I will discuss my experience with book publishing.

Each time I write a new book, I tie it into the preceding book(s) by including graphics of my past book cover(s) at the end of the story along with an updated author bio. I reproduce this promotional copy on my author website and printed flyers, as well. This helps me to sell my backlist along with my frontlist at signings and various other events.

On one particular occasion, I wanted to create a large poster with all my book covers included on it. I intended to use this as an eye-catching display at a craft sale. Great idea, right? Unfortunately, one of the book publishing companies I had published through would not release a high-resolution copy of my book cover to me. “We own it,” they said. “It belongs to us.”

It seems to me, this is a “nobody wins” sort of scenario. This company was not keeping my artwork with the intention of ever using it themselves. They were simply keeping the files to prevent someone else (me) from ever using them.

I founded PPG with the philosophy that self-publishers are not only entitled to 100% copyright ownership of their written words, but they are also entitled to 100% copyright ownership of their artwork. (After all, they are the ones paying for the production of their books.) Rather than storing their print-ready cover and interior files ourselves, we return everything to our self-publishers (working files, finished files, everything). This enables our clients to print extra copies of their books wherever they choose, and it allows them to produce marketing materials at their discretion. To me, this is an “everybody wins” sort of scenario because each time they display their book covers with one of our logos on it, it helps to promote them, the designer, and PPG. That’s how it should be, wouldn’t you agree?

Again, I’m open to hearing from my fellow writers and self-publishers on this one. What is your experience regarding artwork copyright? What’s your opinion on this topic?

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

 

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

 

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

 

Side-by-Side Comparison of Two Book Publishing Methods

To quote the home page of PPG’s book publishing website: “When most people think about having their book published, they envision the traditional method of searching for a publishing company, sending them a query letter along with one or two sample chapters, and then waiting several months for a response as to whether or not their manuscript will even be accepted. That’s one way to publish a book, but it’s not the only way….” In this article, we’ll take a brief look at traditional book publishing versus modern supported self-publishing.

 

 Traditional (Trade) Publishing
 Modern Supported Self-Publishing
  • Traditional book publishers are organizations of highly-qualified people who have joined together to publish a specific selection of books each year.
  • Supportive self-publishing companies consist of highly-qualified people who will assist you in publishing your book by supplying you with the tools you will need.
  • Most trade publishers receive thousands of manuscript submissions every year from which they select fewer than one dozen new authors to work with—a discriminatingly low acceptance rate. One of the primary reasons for this low acceptance rate is that they have preset budgets and objectives for what they can publish each year.A common misconception is that traditional publishers always and only reject manuscripts that are poor in quality when, in fact, that is not the only factor involved. Budget and manpower play a huge role in which projects they can/cannot accept, particularly for the smaller presses. Unfortunately, this means many talented authors are overlooked every year.

  • Most supportive self-publishing companies will accept the majority of manuscripts submitted to them. The reason for this high acceptance rate is that the authors (self-publishers) are the ones who pay all the costs associated with publishing their books. The support company merely compiles all the publishing tools these authors need in a convenient “one stop shop” package so they don’t have to do it themselves.
  • When a traditional book publisher agrees to pay for the publication of your book, they are essentially buying the ownership of your book. They agree to pay for its publication because they believe they can make a profit from owning and selling it. (On the flip side, if the book doesn’t sell, they are the ones who take the loss on their original investment.)
  • When you choose the supportive self-publishing route, you are choosing to pay all your own production and marketing costs in exchange for complete creative control over your work. You also keep all the rights to your work which may prove profitable if/when that book begins to sell well. (On the flip side, if your book doesn’t sell, then you may not be able to recoup your original costs. That loss is yours as the self-publisher. That’s the risk you take if you choose this route.) 
  • Due to the volume of material they must consider, a trade publisher’s manuscript review process can take anywhere from three to six months; and most will reject multiple submissions (a.k.a. simultaneous submissions), meaning they will automatically disregard manuscripts that have been sent to more than one publisher for consideration. If your book is accepted upon review, the production process can take up to another six months to complete.
  • Once you submit your electronic book cover/interior files and payment to a supportive self-publishing company, you’re pretty much ready to go. It’s that easy to get started. The production process, itself, can be completed in as few as eight weeks.
  • If/when your manuscript is accepted, the traditional publisher takes care of all the necessary legwork, such as: obtaining ISBN numbers; managing publishing contracts; designing your copyright page; finding/organizing editors and graphic artists; typesetting your book; dealing with printers and distributors; submitting your book to the Legal Deposit at Library and Archives Canada (LAC); et cetera.
  • Supportive self-publishing companies will manage most (if not all) of the following background details for you: obtaining ISBN numbers; managing publishing agreements; designing your copyright page; finding/organizing editors and graphic designers, etc, for you; typesetting your book; and dealing with POD printers/distributors. (Click here to access PPG’s convenient checklist of the various tasks self-publishers must do for themselves.) 
  • Trade publishers will pay you royalties on whatever books they and their distributors sell on your behalf. You can also buy author copies of your books from them at a significantly reduced price to sell on your own. (Think of them as your book manufacturer/wholesaler, and think of yourself as a retailer.)
  • Supportive self-publishing companies will pay you royalties on whatever books they and their POD distributors sell on your behalf. You can also buy copies of your books from them at a significantly reduced price to sell on your own. (Think of them as your book manufacturer/wholesaler, and think of yourself as a retailer.)
  • If/when your manuscript is accepted for publication, an experienced editor is assigned to work with you to polish and perfect your book. This is a mandatory part of the traditional book publishing process.
  • Some publishers (i.e. vanity publishers) do not require their authors to go through an editorial process … and this is a serious issue, in my humble opinion. Everyone can benefit from copy editing and proofreading. The more sets of eyes you have to review your book, the better. (This is a notable viewpoint that sets supportive self-publishing apart from vanity publishing. It is described in more detail in the below-linked article.)I founded PPG because I strongly believe it is possible for authors to self-publish a professional product if they are willing to go through the same steps a traditional publisher goes through to polish and perfect a book. However, what sets PPG apart from other support companies is that we will refuse to publish anything that, in our judgment, has not been properly edited/proofread. It doesn’t look good for us or the self-publisher unless it’s done right.

  • Most trade publishers still use traditional printing methods, meaning they will print a large run of your books—usually from 500 to 2000 copies to begin with—on an offset press, and they’ll try to sell those off before printing anymore. Because they print this way, their production cost per unit is quite low, so they can charge less for each book. (i.e. The same book may retail at $9.99 when printed the traditional way while it may retail at $12.99 when produced using modern digital “print-on-demand” methods.) The down side is that it costs a lot of money to warehouse all these books; and once you’ve printed that many, you’re stuck with them. There’s no changing them even if you find typos after the fact … which happens more often than not, believe me!
  • Most supportive self-publishing companies use a modern digital printing method called “print-on-demand” (POD). An electronic copy of your book is stored with a special POD press that allows as little as one copy to be printed at a time. This is helpful because you can easily resubmit your book’s e-file to the POD printer if you need to make any corrections or updates along the way. This new method of printing also eliminates expensive warehousing costs. That said, because the books are being printed only a few at a time, the production cost per unit is a bit higher, and this is reflected in the price of your book. (i.e. The same book may retail at $9.99 when printed the traditional way while it may retail at $12.99 when produced using modern “print-on-demand” methods.)
  • Traditional publishing companies actively market and sell their frontlist books on behalf of their authors. They are well-connected.
  • As a self-publisher, it is up to you to market and sell your own books. It is up to you to get well-connected. (Blogging is a great way of doing this!)


  • Because trade publishers produce new books once or twice per year (spring/autumn selections), the shelf-life of each book is typically six months to a year. After that, it moves from the frontlist to the backlist and becomes less of a priority than the new releases.


  • As a self-publisher, you are not confined by someone else’s publishing schedule. You can publish a book at any time of the year, and you can be assured your book will always be given top priority because you are the one in charge of marketing it.

Click here to read another great article comparing traditional (trade) publishing, vanity publishing, and supported self-publishing.

There are obviously pros and cons to each form of book publishing, and there are many varying opinions out there as to which way is best. What are your thoughts on this longstanding debate? I would love to hear from you.
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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

 

Handling Criticism

 

When I published my first book, everything was quite new to me, and I had an expectation (possibly an unfair one) that my friends and family members should support me 100% and compliment me on my book no matter what they thought of it. Luckily, that did happen with my first book. Everyone around me was very supportive.

Unfortunately, when my second book came out, it was a different story. I received an unexpected criticism from someone dear to me that left me shocked, hurt, and unsure how to react. I’ll be honest, it took me a couple years to come to a place where I was willing to put myself out there again. During that time, I had to rethink my expectations of those closest to me and find a way to remain confident in myself and my craft regardless of others’ opinions.

In retrospect, I’m glad I experienced that criticism so early in my publishing career because it taught me a valuable lesson about how I should measure the true merit of my work. A few times, I’ve had to ask myself the question: what is the truth here? Is it the joy and enthusiasm I felt when I held a printed copy of the book in my hand for the very first time? Or is it the self-doubt I felt when someone criticized it later on? Which one of those two moments will I use to determine the value of my book?

 

 

 

A wise woman named Lisa Nichols once said, “Oftentimes, you give others the opportunity to create your happiness, and many times they fail to create it the way you want it. Why? Because only one person can be in charge of your joy … and that’s you. So even your parent, your child, your spouse—they do not have the control to create your happiness. They simply have the opportunity to share in your happiness. Your joy lies within you.” A beautiful sentiment, don’t you think? I believe the same can be said for self-confidence and faith.

 

 

 

I went into my third book with a new set of expectations that took the pressure off both me and those around me. It’s always nice when people acknowledge a new book with a hearty “congratulations,” but I’ve decided that’s where their obligation ends. I no longer base a book’s worth on whether or not others read it, agree with it, enjoy it, or discuss it with me after the fact. The truth I try my best to hold onto is the joy I felt when I held that first printed copy in my hand. I hope you will do the same for you. I hope you will find a way to hold onto your enthusiasm even if you come up against any criticism along the way … whether it’s from friends, family members, reviewers, or anyone else.

Keep writing! Keep the faith!

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

 

Publishing & The Creative Process

 

Three books in, I’m beginning to recognize a familiar pattern concerning my emotional state during the book publishing process. I wonder if other authors experience something similar.

For me, there is a calm sense of accomplishment once I’ve completed that first draft and sent my book off to the editor. Believe it or not, that confidence and faith even survives the editing and graphic design processes despite those annoying little setbacks and frustrations that pop up from time to time. When I first hold the completed book in my hand, I can’t help but feel excited and very proud of myself.

For whatever reason, a day or two later, my confidence in the project takes a nosedive. It suddenly hits me: “Oh, my God. Now I have to share this with people. They’re going to read it.” I feel vulnerable at the thought of it, as though I’ve just stripped down naked in front of 1,000 people and invited them all to take turns pointing out my flaws. A daunting prospect, to say the least!

 

 

 

That insecurity can last up to three or four weeks, until the next book starts to take shape inside my mind. Then the feeling subsides, and I’m fine again. This happens to me every time I publish a book—I’m not sure why—but I’ve come to accept it as a natural part of my creative process. (On the plus side, the confidence always returns, and another book idea always comes in.)

I would like to hear from other published authors about your experiences. Do you go through something similar? How long does it last? Is there anything you do to ease the emotions, or does the mood just pass with time?

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Writing & The Creative Process

 

A common question I hear from people at book signings is, “How do you even begin to write a book? Do you set aside a little time every day, or do you just write when the mood hits you?”

Each of my books was a little bit different….

My first book, A Letter to My Son, took me around ten years to complete. In hindsight, the majority of that time was spent procrastinating rather than writing due to fear of the unknown. I didn’t see that clear path ahead of me. I didn’t know how to get published and wasn’t all that sure it would ever happen, so I felt no strong sense of urgency to finish the book. Then, one year, I experienced a life-changing event that had me questioning myself and my life purpose. It was the catalyst that motivated me to finish my book once and for all … to find a way to publish it … to keep that promise to myself. Once I found that resolve, all the information and resources I needed to publish the book found me. And I did it! (Smiling.) What a proud moment!

 


Each book that followed came a little easier simply because I knew the process ahead of me. Isn’t that the way life is? The first time you try anything is always the hardest. But, if you push through that initial fear and prove to yourself that it’s possible, it does get easier. Needless to say, my second book, A Letter to My Daughter, took me only two months to write. My third book, 11:11, took me around six months.

When I was younger, writing was more a pastime than a career aspiration, so I only wrote when the mood hit me. After my first book was published, and I became a little more serious about things, I found a structure that seems to work very well for me to this day….

 

I treat writing the same way I treat my regular job. I set aside a certain number of hours each week, and I make sure I’m seated at my desk on time. Sometimes, when I sit down to write, I have no idea what I’m going to say. It might take half an hour to get that first awkward sentence out of my mind and “unlock the floodgates” of creativity, but I’m always pleasantly surprised with how much I have at the end of the session. It appears the intention to create is the very thing that attracts the creationevery single time. Another thing I do is set deadlines for myself. In January, I might say, “I want the first draft of this book completed by the end of June.” And then I stick to that schedule. I keep that promise to myself. That’s what seems to work best for me.

I would like to hear from some of my fellow writers out there. What is your creative writing process? I’m interested in learning what works for you.

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PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.

Welcome to My Blog!

 

  Hello! Welcome to my blog. I hope you enjoy your visit.

As a Canadian author who released my third novel and founded the Polished Publishing Group (PPG) in 2009, I’m here to connect with aspiring writers who would like to break into this rewarding profession but aren’t quite sure how to go about it. In addition to writing, I have firsthand experience working with a traditional literary book publisher (a.k.a. trade book publisher), a book printer, and a modern supportive self-publishing company. Each position has allowed me to view this industry from a different vantage point and, consequently, given me a well-rounded understanding of their respective pros and cons. This puts me in a unique position to provide others with valuable insight into the world of book publishing.

That said, we can all learn from each other. Everyone is welcome to post opinions, comments, and/or questions to the various entries on this blog, or start a brand new discussion of your own on the PPG Writers Forum. I also invite the advice of other seasoned writers who are willing to share your experiences and expertise with the rest of us. And if all this information inspires even one person to take that first step toward publishing a book at long last, then this blog has served its purpose.

 


Here’s to setting goals, realizing dreams, and fulfilling self-promises!

 

 

Warm regards,

 

Kim S.

Author of:
A Letter to My Son, © 2004

A Letter to My Daughter, © 2007
11:11, © 2009



Publisher at:

PPG is a professional book publisher dedicated to serving serious-minded authors around the world. Visit our group of websites today:

PPG Book Publishing Website: http://www.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Publisher’s Blog: http://blog.polishedpublishinggroup.com/
PPG Writers Forum: http://writersforum.polishedpublishinggroup.com/

As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2009 to [current year] Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.